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September 7, 2016

Planting a multi-species mixture of cover crops -- rather than a cover crop monoculture -- between cash crops, provides increased agroecosystem services, or multifunctionality, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

August 11, 2016

A genetic mutation may have helped modern humans adapt to smoke exposure from fires and perhaps sparked an evolutionary advantage over their archaic competitors, including Neandertals, according to a team of researchers.

August 2, 2016

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a two-year grant to Jason Rasgon, associate professor of entomology and disease epidemiology at Penn State, to test whether common American mosquitoes can carry the Zika virus.

August 2, 2016

On July 20, Gov. Tom Wolf signed a law allowing the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and institutions of higher education to grow hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) for research purposes. Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences is working with the state department of agriculture to develop the policies, procedures and applications needed to facilitate and guide such research projects.

August 2, 2016

On the surface, trees may look stationary, but underground their roots -- aided by their fungal allies -- are constantly on the hunt and using a surprising number of strategies to find food, according to an international team of researchers.

August 2, 2016

While Penn State has developed a reputation as a leader in pollinator research, the experiences of entomology alumni illustrate another key contribution to pollinator health. Penn State is playing a critical role in training the next generation of scientists to address problems — such as parasitic mites, diseases and pesticide effects — that are likely to take longer to solve than the duration of a research grant or even an entomologist's entire career.

August 2, 2016

Unmanned air vehicles are flying again at Penn State for research, teaching and public service under the auspices of the Office for Research Protections. A new UAV program will ensure compliance with Federal Aviation Administration rules and puts in place an insurance, registration and procedural infrastructure to govern the outdoor operation of unmanned air systems at the University.

August 2, 2016

An apple orchard in full bloom: for many, a simple harbinger of spring. But for David Biddinger and his colleagues and graduate students at Penn State’s Fruit Research and Extension Center, the delicate blooms carry the promise of a future in which bees and pesticides can do their work in harmony at fruit farms across the nation.

July 1, 2016

Fewer female white-tailed deer disperse than males, but when they do, they typically travel more than twice as far, taking much more convoluted paths and covering larger areas, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

June 28, 2016

Bumble bees have discriminating palettes when it comes to their pollen meals, according to researchers at Penn State. The researchers found that bumble bees can detect the nutritional quality of pollen, and that this ability helps them selectively forage among plant species to optimize their diets.

June 28, 2016

Gender researchers from around the world converged at Penn State in June to discuss the importance of incorporating gender concepts into international agricultural research. Sponsored by the College of Agricultural Sciences' Gender, Agriculture and Environment Initiative, the events kicked off with a symposium, followed by a three-week series of workshops funded by a two-year grant from the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research.

June 17, 2016

Researchers from Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences and Ohio University have co-authored a new book, titled “The Rise of Women Farmers and Sustainable Agriculture.” The book examines a recent cultural shift in agriculture, marked by an unprecedented number of women who have entered into farming.

June 17, 2016

The National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation recently awarded grants totaling more than $2 million to research teams led by David Hughes, assistant professor of entomology and biology, to study microbes in the genus Ophiocordyceps -- known as "zombie-ant" fungi -- and how they precisely manipulate the behavior of their ant hosts.

June 17, 2016

When trade organizations representing the chocolate industry created an endowment in 1986 to support Penn State research on Theobroma cacao -- the cocoa tree -- the use of biotechnology to improve plants was still in its infancy. Now, three decades later, the endowment has grown, and along with it the scientific knowledge that is helping to promote economic security for cocoa farmers in developing countries and to ensure a reliable supply of the raw material needed to manufacture one of the world's favorite delicacies.

May 26, 2016

Zombie ants are only one of the fungi-insect relationships studied by a team of Penn State biologists in a newly compiled database of insect fungi interactions.

May 26, 2016

Even though amphibian populations are declining sharply worldwide, there is no smoking gun to indicate a cause and thus no simple solution to halting or reversing these declines.

May 26, 2016

As the agriculture industry adapts to new technologies, researchers in the College of Agricultural Sciences are finding new ways to use computational simulation models to improve global crop management strategies.

May 26, 2016

An apparatus built as a capstone project by a team of senior biological engineering students was created to save farmers' lives by demonstrating extreme danger.

May 26, 2016

An online tool created by researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences will enable manure storage pit designers to develop less dangerous facilities.

May 13, 2016

An insect never before found in the Western Hemisphere has been discovered in Pennsylvania, and agriculture officials are asking growers and home gardeners to help monitor and manage the new invasive pest. The allium leafminer is a threat to several species of crop plants in the genus Allium, such as onion, leek, garlic, chive, shallot and green onion, warned Shelby Fleischer, professor of entomology in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.