New method of analyzing networks reveals hidden patterns in data

October 2, 2019

A new way of measuring how relationships in a network change over time can reveal important details about the network, according to researchers at Penn State and the Korean Rural Economic Institute. For example, when applied to the world economy, the method detected the greatest amount of network change during 2008-09, the time of the global financial crisis.

Livestock disease risk tied to herd management style in Tanzania

October 2, 2019

A new study provides an updated picture of the prevalence of the sheep and goat plague virus (PPRV), a widespread and often fatal disease that threatens 80 percent of the world’s sheep and goats, in northern Tanzania.

Deer browsing is not stopping the densification of Eastern forests

October 2, 2019

A new study led by a Penn State researcher suggests that while deer browsing has impacted tree regeneration in the understory, it has not had much of an impact on forest canopies — and in fact likely has slowed the forest densification process slightly.

Helping Alaskan coastal communities adjust to global warming

October 2, 2019

Alaskan coastal Indigenous communities are facing severe environmental changes that threaten to irrevocably damage their way of life. A $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will allow Penn State researchers to assist local communities with foreseeable environmental challenges and work towards building more resilient communities.

Penn State researchers lead the way in Water-Energy-Food research in Africa

October 2, 2019

Three Penn State researchers — Rachel Brennan, in the College of Engineering, and Mike Jacobson and Brian Thiede, in the College of Agricultural Sciences — recently received $250,000 in University Strategic Plan seed funding to address global Water-Energy-Food (WEF) challenges.

Research predicts stability of mosquito-borne disease prevention

October 2, 2019

To reduce transmission of dengue to humans, scientists have introduced Wolbachia bacteria to A. aegypti mosquitoes. Now a team of international researchers has found that Wolbachia’s ability to block virus transmission may be maintained by natural selection, alleviating concern that this benefit could diminish over time.

Foodborne pathogen sheltered by harmless bacteria that support biofilm formation

October 2, 2019

Pathogenic bacteria that stubbornly lurk in some apple-packing facilities may be sheltered and protected by harmless bacteria that are known for their ability to form biofilms, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery could lead to development of alternative foodborne-pathogen-control strategies.

Explore digital fluency with TLT and the College of Agricultural Sciences

October 2, 2019

This October, Penn State Teaching and Learning with Technology (TLT) and the College of Agricultural Sciences will team up for a one-day symposium on digital fluency. Registration for the event is open, and it is free to attend.

Organic control of spotted lanternfly is focus of study by Penn State, Cornell

October 2, 2019

Studies underway in the Philadelphia region — carried out by scientists from Penn State and Cornell University — aim to answer that question, with early findings showing promise against what has been described as the worst invasive pest to hit the U.S. since the gypsy moth.

Survey aims to help citizens protect themselves from vector-borne illnesses

October 2, 2019

Penn State Extension has established a new vector-borne disease team that focuses on diseases transmitted by ticks and mosquitos. To ensure that its efforts address community needs, the team is launching a survey, the results of which will allow extension educators to deliver responsive programming to educate the public on vector-borne diseases, how to prevent them, and how people can protect themselves.

Penn State Postdoc Society announces 2019 award recipients

October 2, 2019

The Penn State Postdoc Society has announced Molly Hanlon as the recipient of the 2019 Outstanding Postdoc Award, and Klaus Keller as the recipient of the 2019 Outstanding Postdoc Mentor Award.

Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot

October 2, 2019

Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees — such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer — Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle.

Whole genome sequencing may help officials get a handle on disease outbreaks

October 2, 2019

Whole genome sequencing technology may give epidemiologists and health care workers a powerful weapon in tracking and, possibly, controlling outbreaks of serious diseases, according to a team of researchers.

Where curiosity leads

October 2, 2019

Every scientific discovery has one thing in common: It started with a question. But, as Penn State materials scientist Jeffrey Catchmark will attest, sometimes the most ingenious answers come from questions you didn’t even know to ask. Catchmark is developing new biomaterials by manipulating compounds found in nature. His research with biomaterials began with a single question: Is there an eco-friendly alternative to styrofoam?

Penn State professor co-chairs roadmap to guide synthetic biology investments

October 2, 2019

Some of the potential applications of engineering biology, or synthetic biology, sound like science fiction: genetically engineered organisms that produce plastics from carbon dioxide and synthetic gut microbes that detect and wipe out invading organisms before you get sick. Pulling off such futuristic synthetic biology solutions for a wide range of societal problems is the purpose of a technical roadmap recently published by the Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC).

Kaylegian named recipient of Arthur W. Nesbitt Faculty Program Development Award

October 2, 2019

Kerry Kaylegian, associate research professor in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, has been named the recipient of the 2019 Arthur W. Nesbitt Faculty Program Development Award.

Penn State partners with University of Freiburg on center for living materials

October 2, 2019

A new strategic partnership between Penn State and the University of Freiburg in Germany will propel the development of a new class of engineered living materials with potential applications in sustainable infrastructure, robotics technologies, and next-generation medical care. This will enable the institutions to compete globally on ambitious and innovative work that neither institution could accomplish alone.

Student travels to Washington to share passion for international agriculture

October 2, 2019

Sulav Paudel, a doctoral candidate in entomology and in international agriculture and development in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, traveled to Washington, D.C., in June to participate in two conferences aimed at advancing international agriculture and rural development.

Novel powdered milk method yields better frothing agent

October 2, 2019

A novel method of processing — using high-pressure jets to spray milk and then quickly drying the spray — yields skim milk powders with enhanced properties and functionality, according to Penn State researchers, who say the discovery may lead to "cleaner" labels on foods.

Plants defend against insects by inducing 'leaky gut syndrome'

October 2, 2019

Plants may induce "leaky gut syndrome" — permeability of the gut lining — in insects as part of a multipronged strategy for protecting themselves from being eaten, according to researchers at Penn State. By improving our understanding of plant defenses, the findings could contribute to the development of new pest control methods.

Location, Location, Location: Where and How do Food Hubs Flourish?

October 2, 2019

For a new food hub to succeed, it should be located in a community with a population sufficient to sustain it, according to a team of economists, who found that a county seeking to establish its first food hub needs roughly 182,000 residents for that food hub to break even. Their findings could help funding agencies establish criteria to determine whether and where new food hubs should be added.

Graduate students awarded National Institute of Food and Agriculture fellowships

October 2, 2019

Two graduate students in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences received Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Education and Workforce Development fellowships from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

New tuberculosis tests pave way for cow vaccination programs

October 2, 2019

Skin tests that can distinguish between cattle that are infected with tuberculosis (TB) and those that have been vaccinated against the disease have been created by an international team of scientists.

Penn State professor part of team receiving United Nations Public Service Award

October 2, 2019

Ted Alter, professor of agricultural, environmental and regional economics in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, is among an international group of community, industry, government and academic leaders who are being lauded for their work to help manage an invasive and destructive species in Australia.

Ag Progress Days tours showcase a variety of Penn State agricultural research

October 2, 2019

Motorists traveling on state Route 45 about 4 miles west of Pine Grove Mills in Centre County may have noticed equipment, buildings, signage and other clues that indicate the acreage on both sides of the road is not typical farmland.

PlantVillage gives undergraduate a chance to help feed the world via technology

October 2, 2019

PlantVillage began as a website that uses photographs of plant diseases and insect damage to crowdsource answers to crop questions posed by growers from around the world. The project since has grown to include a mobile app that combines artificial intelligence, machine learning and satellite data to diagnose crop problems, which are verified using "ground-truth" monitoring.

Some green ash trees show some resistance to emerald ash borers

October 2, 2019

Genes in green ash trees that may confer some resistance to attacks by the emerald ash borer express themselves only once the tree detects the invasive beetle's feeding, according to Penn State researchers.

'Planting green' cover-crop strategy may help farmers deal with wet springs

October 2, 2019

Allowing cover crops to grow two weeks longer in the spring and planting corn and soybean crops into them before termination is a strategy that may help no-till farmers deal with wet springs, according to Penn State researchers.

Penn State's appropriation increases as General Assembly adopts 2019-20 budget

October 2, 2019

Penn State’s 2019-20 general support appropriation from the Commonwealth increased by 2%, or approximately $4.75 million, as the University’s non-preferred appropriations bill passed the General Assembly today (June 27) as part of Pennsylvania’s $34 billion budget package, which is expected to be signed into law by Gov. Tom Wolf.

College of Agricultural Sciences trains Ethiopians to detect dairy pathogens

October 2, 2019

A two-week training on foodborne pathogen detection methods, focused on dairy, will help educators and government agencies in Ethiopia ensure the safety of dairy products in that country.

Office for Research and Graduate Education

Address

217 Agricultural Administration Building
University Park, PA 16802-2600

Office for Research and Graduate Education

Address

217 Agricultural Administration Building
University Park, PA 16802-2600