Share

News & Information

Latest news from the Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.
Pennsylvania ranks among the top three states with the highest rates of tick-borne disease.   Image: Erika Machtinger
August 16, 2019

Penn State Extension has established a new vector-borne disease team that focuses on diseases transmitted by ticks and mosquitos. To ensure that its efforts address community needs, the team is launching a survey, the results of which will allow extension educators to deliver responsive programming to educate the public on vector-borne diseases, how to prevent them, and how people can protect themselves.

August 14, 2019

Marc Abrams, professor of forest ecology and physiology and Steimer Professor of Agricultural Sciences in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, recently received a Lifetime Achievement Award for his work.

August 14, 2019

Beth Gugino, professor of vegetable pathology in the Department of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, received this year’s Excellence in Extension Award presented by the American Phytopathological Society. This year’s meeting, Plant Health 2019, was held in Cleveland, Ohio, from Aug. 3 to 7.

August 12, 2019

The Penn State Postdoc Society has announced the winner of the 2019 Outstanding Postdoc Award, Molly Hanlon, and the winner of the 2019 Outstanding Postdoc Mentor Award, Klaus Keller.

Gabe Knowles, STEM education outreach specialist for the Center for Science and the Schools, participated in the pollen microscopy session at the recent Authentic Plant Pollinator Landscape Research for Educators Workshop, held at Penn State.   Image: Penn State
August 12, 2019

The recent Authentic Plant Pollinator Landscape Research for Educators Workshop at Penn State attracted 13 kindergarten through 12th grade educators from across Pennsylvania and beyond, and it allowed educators to work closely with members of Penn State’s Center for Science and the Schools and Center for Pollinator Research.

Penn State researchers continue to focus on Asian longhorned beetles because the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has spent approximately $640 million to eradicate outbreaks of the wood-boring insect in four states, and eradication efforts continue in three states.   Image: Charlie Mason/Penn State
August 12, 2019

Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees — such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer — Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle.

"Research to Action: The Science of Drawdown," which takes place from Sept. 16–18, 2019, at The Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, will feature climate solutions experts from around the globe, including 15 members of the conference's steering committee.   Image: Penn State
August 12, 2019

"Research to Action: The Science of Drawdown," which takes place from Sept. 16–18, 2019, at The Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, will feature climate solutions experts from around the globe, including 15 members of the conference's steering committee.

Rick Roush, dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences, speaks at a recent event while Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture Russell Redding looks on. The two leaders will hold a town hall meeting Aug. 13 during Penn State's Ag Progress Days expo.   Image: Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture
August 9, 2019

Elected officials and leaders of government agencies will use the opportunity afforded by Penn State's Ag Progress Days, set for Aug.13-15, to inform — and get feedback from — the public and industry stakeholders about agricultural programs and policy priorities at the state and federal levels.

Jess Sourbeer, a forest ecosystem management student in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, is passionate about forestry.    Image: Jess Sourbeer
August 7, 2019

Jess Sourbeer, of Pittsburgh, has found her niche in forestry through internships at both Penn State Extension and Architect of the Capitol, the federal agency in charge of maintaining Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

This computer rendering shows the structure of Shigella bacteria. Penn State researchers are helping public health officials identify possible infectious disease threats, so they can prepare prevention and treatment options.   Image: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
August 6, 2019

In a series of studies, researchers showed that whole genome analysis can provide highly detailed information on pathogens in a timely fashion. The findings could help public officials prepare treatment and prevention options when disease outbreaks threaten the public.

Colin Geary and Nelson DiBiase, biorenewable systems majors in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, successfully created a prototype of a fully compostable climbing hold.   Image: Penn State
August 5, 2019

From the top of Penn State's indoor rock climbing wall, climbers can enjoy views of Beaver Stadium, Rothrock State Forest and even a sunset over Happy Valley. From the ground, Colin Geary and Nelson DiBiase, biorenewable systems majors in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, saw something different: a sport inspired by nature, using a wall’s worth of plastic.

Penn State's Ag Progress Days kicks off Aug. 13 and continues through Aug. 15 at the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Rock Springs in Ferguson Township, Centre County.   Image: Penn State
August 5, 2019

Everything agriculture and more can be found at Penn State's Ag Progress Days, which kicks off Aug. 13 and continues through Aug. 15 at the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Rock Springs in Ferguson Township, Centre County.

Where Curiosity Leads-Catchmark with foam
August 5, 2019

One scientist’s quest to create a replacement for plastics led him to something entirely different—a biofoam that fills traumatic wounds, stops bleeding, and dissolves as the wound heals.

Producers can learn how to better manage internal parasites at a Penn State Extension workshop titled, “It’s a Wormy Deal,” which will be held at three locations across Pennsylvania.    Image: Penn State
August 1, 2019

It’s turning out to be a difficult year for sheep and goat producers in Pennsylvania. Wet weather has resulted in ideal conditions for internal parasites to flourish in pasture systems, which can lead to infected animals. Producers can learn how to better manage internal parasites at a Penn State Extension workshop titled, “It’s a Wormy Deal,” which will be held at three locations across Pennsylvania in August and September.

“Finding Pennsylvania’s Solar Future” is the second webinar in Penn State Extension’s Summer/Fall 2019 Land-Use Webinar series that runs monthly from July through November. The series helps municipal elected and appointed officials, planners, landowners, farmers, community organizations and other interested people to be informed regarding land-use issues and decisions in their communities.   Image: Penn State
August 1, 2019

Pennsylvania is well situated to lead the country into the next age of energy development with clean, renewable solar photovoltaic energy, a topic that will be discussed during a web-based seminar to be offered by Penn State Extension.

Gregory Jenkins, right, professor of meteorology and atmospheric sciences and adviser for EnvironMentors at Penn State, said the program exposes underrepresented high school students to STEM fields so that they begin a path toward successful careers even before they enter college. EnvironMentors is seeking mentors at all levels, including faculty, graduate students and undergraduates.   Image: Provided
July 31, 2019

EnvironMentors at Penn State, a local chapter of a national program focused on engaging and preparing underrepresented high school students for careers in STEM fields, is looking for faculty mentors as it expands into its second year.

The flowers and plantings in the 9-year-old demonstration plots at the site attract and nourish huge numbers of native bees, butterflies and other pollinators.    Image: Penn State
July 31, 2019

Creating pollinator-friendly landscapes again will be the focus of the Yard and Garden Area at Ag Progress Days, Aug. 13-15, but many other activities will be going on there, as well.

Students recently toured Thailand for a Maymester study course that focused on how a developing nation deals with natural disasters.   Image: Kevin Furlong
July 31, 2019

From its gorgeous beaches to energetic cities, Thailand is known for its iconic tourist attractions. Penn State students who recently toured the Southeast Asian nation as part of a Maymester study course took the road less traveled, learning about natural hazards facing the developing nation, with pit stops visiting elephant sanctuaries, animal hospitals, hydroelectric plants and mangrove-lined coastlines.

Tom Hogan, professor of practice in the School of Labor and Employment Relations, speaks at a workshop at the 2018 Student Engagement Network Summit. Hogan is now also a member of SEN's Faculty Academy.   Image: Steve Tressler
July 30, 2019

Five faculty were added to the Faculty Academy program through the Student Engagement Network at Penn State.

With more than 500 commercial and educational exhibits, as well as numerous field demonstrations and workshops, there is plenty to see and do at Penn State’s Ag Progress Days, Aug. 13-15.   Image: Penn State
July 29, 2019

The latest in agricultural technology, research and equipment will be front and center at Penn State's Ag Progress Days, slated for Aug. 13-15 at the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Rock Springs in Ferguson Township, Centre County.