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July 13, 2018

In a forthcoming paper, we use three different datasets to characterize differences in purchasing patterns across income levels and rural-urban status of food shoppers in the Northeastern US.

Ryan Lee (third from left) after successfully defending his dissertation.
July 6, 2018

Congratulations to Dr. Ryan Lee, who received his doctoral degree from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2017. While conducting his dissertation research, he also was a student member of the EFSNE Consumption Team.

May 7, 2018

In 2015 and 2016, several Consumption Team members hosted events that shared some of the results of the EFSNE project to engage community members on food and agriculture issues in their particular locations. The events, funded by a separate NIFA conference grant, were as diverse as the communities themselves. In some cases they resulted in new on-the-ground efforts to promote food access. These activities sought to stimulate thinking around taking regional level data on food and agricultural sectors and applying it to the local context. Here's what took place in Baltimore, MD, Dover, DE, and Charleston, WV.

From 2011-2018, the EFSNE team engaged professionals from multiple universities, non-profits and government agencies.
February 12, 2018

For seven years a multidisciplinary team of more than 40 researchers has explored the extent to which a more robust regional food system in the Northeastern U.S. could improve food access in low-income communities and improve the long-term food security of the entire Northeast. Now, in an initial collection of three papers published in the Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, team members have summarized some of their findings.

A tree planting in Syracuse, NY. Credit: Cornell Cooperative Extension Onondaga County.
November 21, 2016

During the past 18 months, several Consumption Team members hosted events that shared some of the results of the EFSNE project to engage community members on food and agriculture issues in their particular locations. The events, funded by a separate NIFA conference grant, were as diverse as the communities themselves. In some cases they resulted in new on-the-ground efforts to promote food access. These activities sought to stimulate thinking around taking regional level data on food and agricultural sectors and applying it to the local context.

November 18, 2016

Congratulations to Dr. John Eshleman, who received his doctoral degree from Penn State earlier this year. While conducting his dissertation research, Eshleman also was a student member of the EFSNE project’s Consumption team for more than three years and served as a member of its administrative team as well.

Ripple in a body of water. Credit: Roger McLassus via Wikimedia Commons
November 16, 2015

The community-based work carried out by members of the Consumption Team has had an unintended ripple effect — it has spawned several local-level activities aimed at improving access to healthy and regionally produced foods.

May 4, 2015

As the EFSNE project enters its fifth year, the Consumption Team is marking a major milestone: the completion of its shopper intercept survey effort. Over the course of three years, team members surveyed some 2,700 shoppers, paving the way for researchers to answer several questions about the food-shopping experiences of those surveyed.

February 13, 2015

There are more than a dozen food stores being studied by the EFSNE project team, an activity that would be impossible if not for the cooperation of the owners and managers who run those stores. Whether providing space for the Consumption Team to conduct intercept surveys or participating in interviews with the Distribution Team, these retailers are integral to the success of the project. And in November, several of them helped in an additional way, by traveling to Maryland to participate in a two-day workshop with EFSNE project researchers, graduate students, and community liaisons. Their participation proved to be beneficial both for the project team and for each other.

Focus group participants in Baltimore
October 28, 2014

At a community center and a convent, at a business development center and a food pantry, and in several other locations across the Northeast, people have been talking very intentionally about food during the past few months. These facilitated conversations, or focus groups, are one of the Consumption Team’s major research activities aimed at understanding people’s experiences accessing healthy food in their communities.

Community Liaison Monica Kessell conducting a store inventory. Kessell is one of a dozen or so people to conduct the yearly surveys. Credit: Bonnie Parsons
March 25, 2014

Some people might have a preconceived idea of what a grocery store in a low-income neighborhood is like — how it looks, the kinds of foods it stocks, and how well its customers are served. Consumption Team member John Eshleman did, but that was before he became intimately familiar with a tool developed to capture the substantial diversity that exists among food stores.

A member of the EFSNE Consumption Team conducts an intercept survey with a Baltimore shopper. Credit: Anne Palmer, Johns Hopkins University
December 11, 2013

Community involvement is at the heart of the EFNSE project, and our researchers rely on community members’ help for many aspects of the project. During the last year, researchers on the Consumption Team conducted their first round of shopper intercept surveys, asking members of each of the project’s nine partner communities to take a break from their grocery shopping to participate in the survey. All told, they surveyed 902 shoppers at 17 stores.