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The EFSNE project studied a number of consumption, distribution, production, and other aspects of the Northeast US food system, which includes the 12 states from Maine to West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
July 13, 2018

After seven years of analyzing a number of consumption, distribution, production, and other aspects of the Northeast US food system, EFSNE researchers have made significant gains in understanding the extent to which the region can increase production of certain foods, and potentially better meet the food needs of low-income populations in the locations they studied. Findings and outputs from the project, which concluded earlier this year, will be useful to food system planners, policy makers, researchers and advocates interested in advancing regional food systems.

July 13, 2018

In a forthcoming paper, we use three different datasets to characterize differences in purchasing patterns across income levels and rural-urban status of food shoppers in the Northeastern US.

July 6, 2018

Congratulations to Dr. Emily Piltch, who received her doctoral degree from Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in 2018. While studying at Tufts, she also was a student member of the EFSNE Production Team for four years, working with Drs. Tim Griffin and Christian Peters.

July 6, 2018

Congratulations to Dr. Graham Jeffries, who received his doctoral degree in Agriculture, Food and Environment from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University earlier this year. While pursuing his master’s degree at Tufts, Jeffries was a student member of the EFSNE project, working with Tim Griffin who co-leads the Production Team.

Ryan Lee (third from left) after successfully defending his dissertation.
July 6, 2018

Congratulations to Dr. Ryan Lee, who received his doctoral degree from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2017. While conducting his dissertation research, he also was a student member of the EFSNE Consumption Team.

May 7, 2018

Outreach team members have produced several research briefs that serve to distill peer-reviewed journal articles authored by EFSNE team members into 2-4 page documents intended for a general audience. The briefs describe the issue(s) addressed by a particular research paper, outline the study’s objectives, methods, and findings, and discuss the implications and applications of the findings. Ten titles are currently available, and team members plan to release additional briefs in the coming months. If you'd like to be notified when new briefs are posted, email Kristen Devlin (krd111@psu.edu) to be added to the mailing list.

May 7, 2018

In 2015 and 2016, several Consumption Team members hosted events that shared some of the results of the EFSNE project to engage community members on food and agriculture issues in their particular locations. The events, funded by a separate NIFA conference grant, were as diverse as the communities themselves. In some cases they resulted in new on-the-ground efforts to promote food access. These activities sought to stimulate thinking around taking regional level data on food and agricultural sectors and applying it to the local context. Here's what took place in Baltimore, MD, Dover, DE, and Charleston, WV.

From 2011-2018, the EFSNE team engaged professionals from multiple universities, non-profits and government agencies.
February 12, 2018

For seven years a multidisciplinary team of more than 40 researchers has explored the extent to which a more robust regional food system in the Northeastern U.S. could improve food access in low-income communities and improve the long-term food security of the entire Northeast. Now, in an initial collection of three papers published in the Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, team members have summarized some of their findings.

The full set of case studies is available online at https://goo.gl/xrTgMm
January 30, 2018

EFSNE researchers at Cornell University have analyzed where Northeast supermarkets source the foods they sell to their low-income customers. These case studies offer policymakers a better understanding of how regional food systems could bring healthier food to low-income people in the Northeast, and are the first of their kind to be conducted in the region.

A tree planting in Syracuse, NY. Credit: Cornell Cooperative Extension Onondaga County.
November 21, 2016

During the past 18 months, several Consumption Team members hosted events that shared some of the results of the EFSNE project to engage community members on food and agriculture issues in their particular locations. The events, funded by a separate NIFA conference grant, were as diverse as the communities themselves. In some cases they resulted in new on-the-ground efforts to promote food access. These activities sought to stimulate thinking around taking regional level data on food and agricultural sectors and applying it to the local context.

Image: USDA
November 20, 2016

Although more than half of the food-producing farmland in the Northeast U.S. is devoted to producing animal feeds and forages, the region still relies on additional imports to meet the needs of its livestock operations, according to several members of the Production Team. Their findings build on earlier work to provide a more complete picture of how self-reliant the region is in meeting its population’s demand for animal-based foods like meat, dairy, and eggs.

November 18, 2016

Congratulations to Dr. John Eshleman, who received his doctoral degree from Penn State earlier this year. While conducting his dissertation research, Eshleman also was a student member of the EFSNE project’s Consumption team for more than three years and served as a member of its administrative team as well.

November 18, 2016

After five years co-leading this eCoP, Brian Raison handed over the reins to Kathleen Liang who moved from UVM to assume the Kellogg Endowed Professor for Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at NC A&T. With support from an AFRI grant, Katie Wright at the University of Arkansas, serves as part-time staff until mid-2017. This eCoP has over 400 members, making it the second largest community of practice of the 70 that eXtension hosts.

November 17, 2016

Congratulations to Dr. Nicole Tichenor, who received her doctoral degree from Tufts University earlier this year. While conducting her dissertation research, she also was a student member of the Production Team.

EFSNE Project interns Hayly Hoch, left, and Alyssa Gurklis.
November 15, 2016

Interdisciplinarity is a hallmark of the EFSNE project, so it’s fitting that the project’s most recent interns—two Penn State students from very different majors—found learning from each other to be an important part of the internship experience.

More than 100 people gathered for the EFSNE conference, which was held in Greenbelt, MD in early December.
January 20, 2016

Most of the presentations that were delivered during the project's December 2015 conference are now available online in PDF format.

Dairy cows lined up at feeding trough. Image: Nate Bevans via Penn State News
November 23, 2015

A team of researchers including members of the Distribution Team published a paper last year that illustrates tradeoffs posed by initiatives that promote the purchase of foods grown and processed within certain geographic boundaries. They analyzed the existing Northeastern U.S. dairy supply chain, which served as their baseline scenario, and compared it to two possible localization scenarios in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, economic effects, and the distance that the milk or milk product travels between the dairy farms and the final consumption location.

Ripple in a body of water. Credit: Roger McLassus via Wikimedia Commons
November 16, 2015

The community-based work carried out by members of the Consumption Team has had an unintended ripple effect — it has spawned several local-level activities aimed at improving access to healthy and regionally produced foods.

Graph showing cumulative potential of New York's farmland. See bottom of page for full-size image and caption.
November 16, 2015

One way to increase a region’s capacity to meet its food needs is to bring new land into production; another is to change the mix of crops produced on existing farmland. But what are the potential yields we could expect from new or converted land? That’s the question behind a new tool developed by the Production Team — a productivity index that will help quantify the production capacity of all the arable land in the Northeast.

Members of SCEMO, from L-R: Michael Conard, Kate Clancy, David Fleisher, Tim Griffin, Patrick Canning, Christian Peters, Houtian (Frank) Ge.
November 13, 2015

In early June, the Scenarios and Modeling (SCEMO) and Production teams held a two-day in-person meeting in New York City to plan for the modeling work that will take place during the last year of the EFSNE project. The team also discussed their role in the cross-project writing that remains, and made preparations for the project conference slated for December. The group was hosted by team member Michael Conard at Columbia University.