Diversity

The Office of Multicultural Affairs leads and supports the College in interweaving diversity into the very fabric of our daily operation and into every aspect of our collegial practices.

Office of Multicultural Affairs

The Office of Multicultural Affairs leads and supports the College in interweaving diversity into the very fabric of our daily operation and into every aspect of our collegial practices. The office strives to create a welcoming environment for everyone by providing curricula and special programming that teach a fuller appreciation of the uniqueness among diverse groups.

Latest Multicultural News

‘Learning to Be Latino’
September 18, 2018
Author discusses new book on what it means to be Latino at three distinctly different institutions: a liberal arts college, a research university and a regional public university. For two years, Daisy Verduzco Reyes, an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut, sat quietly in the background during Latino student organization meetings at three different colleges. She listened to determine how students thought and talked about what it meant to be Latino and paid attention to what was discussed, what kinds of events were planned and whether or not the group was political.
Walking on Campus… While Black
September 18, 2018
Incident at UMass is the latest in which the police are called on nonwhite people on campus, doing nothing wrong at all. On Friday morning, the tip line at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst received an anonymous call: "A gentleman, African American, bald, red/white pinstripe shirt, dark khakis, large duffel bag on the right shoulder, hanging off a strap, very heavy hanging on the ground, seemed very agitated, walking up the ramp, into Whitmore [a campus building]. I thought I would send that information if someone could go and check, because he seemed like a very upset young man walking into that building."
'Nevertheless She Persisted?'
September 18, 2018
Having female peers -- even just a few of them -- can increase a woman’s odds of making it through her Ph.D. program in the natural sciences, technology, engineering or math, says a new working paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research.