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Enhancing Food Security in the Northeast

Enhancing Food Security in the Northeast through Regional Food Systems (EFSNE) seeks to determine whether greater reliance on regionally produced food could improve food access in low-income communities, while also benefiting farmers, food supply chain firms and others in the food system.

A USDA-funded Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) project, EFSNE brings together researchers, educators, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from a twelve-state region in the Northeast, engaging the entire food chain from production to consumption in a collaborative effort.

Food Security Research News

New collection of papers explores Northeast U.S. food system, community engagement, and citizens’ perceptions of “regional foods”
February 12, 2018
For seven years a multidisciplinary team of more than 40 researchers has explored the extent to which a more robust regional food system in the Northeastern U.S. could improve food access in low-income communities and improve the long-term food security of the entire Northeast. Now, in an initial collection of three papers published in the Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, team members have summarized some of their findings.
Supply chain case studies explore how supermarkets source foods for low-income customers
January 30, 2018
For the first time, EFSNE researchers at Cornell University have analyzed where Northeast supermarkets source the foods they sell to their low-income customers. These case studies offer policymakers a better understanding of how regional food systems could bring healthier food to low-income people in the Northeast.
Local events engage communities and share project findings—part one
November 21, 2016
During the past 18 months, several Consumption Team members hosted events that shared some of the results of the EFSNE project to engage community members on food and agriculture issues in their particular locations. The events, funded by a separate NIFA conference grant, were as diverse as the communities themselves. In some cases they resulted in new on-the-ground efforts to promote food access. These activities sought to stimulate thinking around taking regional level data on food and agricultural sectors and applying it to the local context.

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