Detailed instructions for exhibitors as well as judging criteria.

Instructions to Exhibitors

The 2021 Gamma Sigma Delta Research Exhibition will take place virtually. Posters will be displayed through a virtual platform https://www.congregate.live/gsdexpo.

  • Presenters must be online with their posters between 3:30 and 6:00 pm on March 23, 2021.
  • Graduate posters will be judged between 3:30 and 4:30 pm.
  • Undergraduate posters will judged between 5 and 6 pm.
  • More details will follow with an opportunity to practice in Congregate on March 16 until 4:00 pm. Please plan to attend the practice sessions.
  • In addition, a pdf file of the final poster will be due on March 16 by 11:59 pm.

Exhibitors are also expected to be present for the GSD Celebration of Excellence Ceremony at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 30 held via ZOOM. Advisers are strongly encouraged to attend the Ceremony with their advisees. The 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners in each category will be recognized at the celebration. Monetary awards will be distributed to undergraduate and graduate winners.

Exhibit Judging Criteria

Exhibits will be judged on their quality in three areas:

Abstract (10% of total score)

The purpose of the abstract is to summarize the significant findings of the research being presented.  The abstract is part of the registration process, and, once submitted it will not be available for any subsequent modifications, so be sure that your abstract is complete, concise, and reflective of the overall content of the submission. Abstracts are limited to maximum of 300 words (12 pt font) and should be submitted as a Word document.

Content (40% of total score)

The purpose of an exhibit is to convey to a wide audience a research project's significance to scholars in the field and its potential significance to the general public.

The exhibit should testify to the careful design and execution of the research and present clear results that are well interpreted. It must include:

  • short title of the exhibit
  • student's name (or names, if more than one student is presenting the exhibit)
  • collaborators, advisor(s), and department(s)
  • funding sources
  • proof of regulatory committee approval (if the project involves human or animal subjects or bio-hazardous materials)
  • objectives
  • significance to the field
  • significance to society in general
  • methods
  • results
  • interpretation of results and conclusions
  • directions for future research

Display (30% of total score)

The core of each exhibit is a poster, with text and graphics intended for a more general audience with no prior knowledge in your specific discipline.

  • The poster must presented in a virtual setting. A pdf file is requested in advance to aid in judging but students are reminded of limited viewing space that will be available in this virtual setting.
  • The poster should attract attention and convey information concisely.
  • Language should be simple and descriptions brief. Jargon should be avoided; necessary technical terms should be defined.
  • Spelling and grammar must be correct. All text should be large enough to be read on the computer screen.
  • Photographs, drawings, charts, tables, or graphs should be simple, well organized, and carefully chosen to quickly explain complicated technical concepts to a wide audience.

Oral presentation (20% of total score)

Each student should have prepared an oral discussion of his or her exhibit. This discussion must not exceed 5 minutes. A videotape or demonstration cannot be submitted for the discussion. The oral presentation should be clear and concise and should include the major points presented on the poster:

  • objectives
  • significance to the field
  • significance to society in general
  • methods
  • results
  • interpretation of results and conclusions
  • directions for future research

If the student worked with collaborators on the project, including his or her advisor, this presentation must clearly describe the student's role in the overall project.