Institute for Sustainable Agricultural, Food, and Environmental Science (SAFES)

An interdisciplinary, science-to-practice platform to study landscape-level challenges

The Institute for Sustainable Agricultural, Food, and Environmental Science (SAFES) establishes a novel environment for accelerating solutions to persistently "wicked" landscape-level challenges centered on agriculture, food, and the environment. The science of agricultural sustainability underpins the mission of SAFES and provides a comprehensive approach to the complexity of challenges which integrates natural and social sciences with technological advancements, human behavior, economics, and policy.

Latest News

February 19, 2024

Common plant could help reduce food insecurity, researchers find

An often-overlooked water plant that can double its biomass in two days, capture nitrogen from the air — making it a valuable green fertilizer — and be fed to poultry and livestock could serve as life-saving food for humans in the event of a catastrophe or disaster, a new study led by Penn State researchers suggests.

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February 12, 2024

Dairy cows fed botanicals-supplemented diets use energy more efficiently

Supplementing the feed of high-producing dairy cows with the botanical extract capsicum oleoresin, obtained from chili peppers, or a combination of that extract and clove oil resulted in the animals using feed energy more efficiently and emitting less methane from their largest stomach, according to a new study conducted by Penn State researchers.

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February 8, 2024

No place like Antarctica: Students take study abroad trip of a lifetime

For the first time, Penn State students could experience Antarctica’s wonders through an embedded course, “Antarctica: Human Impacts on a Fragile Environment,” offered this past fall.

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February 2, 2024

Supplementing financial aid with education may benefit SNAP recipients

Federal programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) have been boosting food security for Americans in need for decades. New research suggests that pairing education with this financial assistance could help to improve diet quality, as well.

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