AGBIO 594: Agricultural Biosecurity and Food Defense Capstone Experience

1–15 credit course. This course is comprised of supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.

AGBIO 801: Veterinary Infectious Disease Diagnostic and Surveillance Systems

3 credit course. Offered Spring. This course provides knowledge of diagnostic and surveillance systems used to detect infectious diseases and protect against animal agricultural biological attack.

AGBIO 802: Plant Protection: Responding to Introductions of Threatening Pests and Pathogens

3 credit course. Offered Spring. This course provides knowledge of plant biosecurity, plant disease, regulations, and technologies using case study examples.

AGBM 200: Introduction to Agricultural Business Management

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. Principles of business management are provided using a variety of examples from industries in agribusiness, which offer real-world experiences. Exploring the institutions and issues, such as food safety and biotechnology, that are unique to managers in the agribusiness sector is emphasized.

AGRO 596: Individual Studies

1–9 credit course. Offered Spring, Summer, and Fall. This course in Individual Studies in agronomy is for students who will be working on their capstone project with their adviser. It is based on creative projects, including non-thesis research, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.

ANSC 100: Introduction to Animal Industries (GN)

3 credit course. Offered Spring (Digital Learning Cooperative), Summer, and Fall. This course will introduce students to the breadth and scope of animal agriculture in North America with an emphasis on food-producing animals.

ANSC 215: Pets in Society (GS)

3 credit course. Offered Summer and Fall. This course provides information that will be used to make informed decisions about pet ownership, pet care, controversial legal issues, and societal responsibilities. Satisfies General Education - Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS).

CEDEV 430: Principles of Local Economic Development

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. Concepts, strategies, and techniques of local economic analysis, planning, and development; and decision-making exercises.

CEDEV 452: Community Structure, Processes and Capacity

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. Social organization, processes, and change in communities; use of sociological principles in the analysis of community problems and development.

CEDEV 500: Community and Economic Development: Theory and Practice

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. Understanding theories, concepts, and frameworks of community and economic development and community decision-making models in application to community development practice and issues.

CEDEV 505: Leadership Development

3 credit course. Offered Spring, Summer, and Fall. This course introduces students to the four basic elements of leadership: personal, interpersonal, group/organization, and community.

CEDEV 509: Population, Land Use, and Municipal Finance

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. This course provides a multidimensional overview of three key aspects of community and economic development. Population—the people. Land use—the place. Municipal finance—the things they do there.

CEDEV 575: Methods and Techniques for Community and Economic Development

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. Typical topics include several methods and techniques in these areas: general community assessment techniques, specialized techniques for community and economic development, and leadership and process skills.

CEDEV 580: Research Application and Practice

3 credit course. This course provides essential information for the process of writing and developing a framework for students to apply, integrate, and practice the theories, concepts, and methods from the CEDEV curriculum in developing the topic, outline and literature review for their required Master's paper.

CEDEV 596: Individual Studies

1–6 credit course. Offered Spring, Summer, and Fall. Creative projects, including non-thesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.

CEDEV 597E: Theories, Principles & Institutions of International Development

3 credit course. Offered Spring. This course offers theoretical and practice background that provides the capacity to analyze and scrutinize some of the most chronic developmental problems of the twenty-first century and to provide participants with the practical skills to provide resolution along a wide spectrum of critical policy areas.

EMGT 820: Environmental Law and Policy

3 credit course. Offered Spring. This course provides a broad exploration of the basic legal principles, regimes, and issues related to environmental protection and natural resource management.

ENT 202: The Insect Connection (GN)

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. This course is designed for non-science majors who have no science background, thus, there are no course prerequisites. The amazing world of insects and how they interact with humans is the focus of the course. Materials are presented in a multi-media format, including several videos. There are 24 lessons with weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final exam. Students will complete a writing assignment involving summarizing and critically analyzing a current news story in the popular press about insects.

FDSC 200: Introductory Food Science

3 credit course. Offered Spring (Digital Learning Cooperative). General overview and principles; food constituents and properties; quality and safety; preservation methods; processing animal and plant products.

FDSC 515: Sensometrics - Applied Multivariate Analysis in Sensory & Food Science

3 credit course. Offered Spring. The main objective of this course is to allow each student to develop the necessary data analysis skills needed for analyzing and interpreting sensory and consumer data.

HORT 101: Horticultural Science

3 credit course. Offered Spring, Summer, and Fall. Introduction to horticulture with an emphasis on plant domestication, morphology, classification, world food crops, commodities, gardens, propagation, and agrochemicals. Prerequisites: None

INTAG 100: Introduction to International Agriculture

3 credit course. Offered Spring (Digital Learning Cooperative). This course focuses on agriculture in developing countries and frames this focus with a discussion of contemporary crucial issues facing agriculture on a global scale, emphasizing global hunger and food security.

PLANT 200: Introduction to Agricultural Crop Growth, Form, and Function

3 credit course. Offered Spring (Digital Learning Cooperative). This course provides an introduction to various aspects of plants including growth strategies, cellular makeup, genetics, and reproduction. Special attention will be paid to gardening, crop biotechnologies, and to plant adaptations in response to environmental stressors. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and SOILS 101

TURF 230: Turfgrass Pesticides

1 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. Covers chemical toxicity, formulations, environmental fate, labels, MSDS, calibration, IPM, safety, handling, storage, and Pennsylvania certification and regulations.

TURF 235: Turfgrass

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Fall. Characterization of the primary plant species used for sports, lawn and utility turf; includes turfgrass morphology, environmental adaptation, and cultural requirements.

TURF 238: Turf and Ornamental Weed Control

3 credit course. Offered Spring and (Summer, even years). Introduces the development of integrated weed management strategies utilizing a variety of cultural and chemical methods.

TURF 307: Golf Course Irrigation and Drainage

3 credit course. Offered Spring. This is a course developed to instruct students, interested in working in the turfgrass management profession. Note: PLANT 217 may not be substituted for TURF 307 for prescribed course credit. The majority of the course is devoted to irrigation topics with a strong concentration on turfgrass irrigation applications, while the remainder concerns surface and subsurface drainage. The course covers the following topics: The influence of weather on irrigation management; sprinkler characteristics, selection; management of piping and control systems; maximizing irrigation efficiency by using turfgrass evapotranspiration, soil characteristics, and expectations of venue; fundamental hydraulics, irrigation layout and piping sizing; pump characteristics and system winterization; surface and subsurface drainage systems. The course also includes short field trips to various local industry-related facilities for educational evaluation. Prerequisite: MATH 021, SOILS 101

TURF 425: Turfgrass Cultural Systems

3 credit course. A study of turfgrass maintenance practices and how their interrelationships can be utilized to develop management systems. Students will integrate different turfgrass maintenance practices into sound management strategies that lead to the production of high-quality turfgrass areas.

TURF 434: Turfgrass Edaphology

3 credit course. Offered Spring and Summer. Students will learn to interpret soil physical results using the United States Golf Associated specifications for greens construction, evaluate and manipulate the physical properties of a soil in order to provide a quality turfgrass stand under varying conditions, and more.

TURF 435: Turfgrass Nutrition

4 credit course. Offered Spring. A study in the nutrition and growth of turfgrass plants, emphasizing constructed and mineral soil fertility, nutrient uptake and function, and fertilizer use efficiency.