College of Agricultural Sciences

The Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences offers 17 undergraduate majors, 23 minors, and graduate programs in 18 major areas.

College News and Information

The mystery involved a spontaneous gene mutation that causes red pigments to show up in various corn plant tissues for a few generations and then disappear in subsequent progeny.   Image: Surinder Chopra Research Group/Penn State
Unraveling of 58-year-old corn gene mystery may have plant-breeding implications
January 17, 2019
In discovering a mutant gene that "turns on" another gene responsible for the red pigments sometimes seen in corn, researchers solved an almost six-decades-old mystery with a finding that may have implications for plant breeding in the future.
A growing share of Pennsylvania's total population resides in 15 southeastern counties, while much of the rest of the state continues to lose population, according to a new report by economists in the College of Agricultural Sciences.   Image: B_Me via Pixabay
Report: Pennsylvania population trends mirror employment changes since 2000
January 17, 2019
Changes in the distribution of Pennsylvania's population — largely toward the state's southeastern quadrant — reflect challenges that policymakers need to address to promote and maintain statewide prosperity, suggests a new report compiled by economists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
As a food science major in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, Andrew Cotter conducted research on the storage of coffee beans. He showed that storing roasted coffee beans in the freezer -- a popular preservation method -- can help preserve the aroma of certain varieties of beans.    Image: Pexels
Wake up and smell the coffee: Research shows freezing beans can preserve aroma
January 15, 2019
As a food science major in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, Andrew Cotter conducted research on the storage of coffee beans. He showed that storing roasted coffee beans in the freezer — a popular preservation method — can help preserve the aroma of certain varieties of beans.
This image shows a cell infected with Zika virus (green). The red is heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), which appears to play a role in enabling Zika infection of host cells.   Image: Rasgon laboratory / Penn State
Cellular protein a target for Zika control
January 14, 2019
A cellular protein that interacts with invading viruses appears to help enable the infection process of the Zika virus, according to an international team of researchers who suggest this protein could be a key target in developing new therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus infection.

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Upcoming Events

2019 Ice Cream 101: Introduction to Frozen Desserts
When: January 25-27, 2019
Where: University Park, PA
Principles of Sensory Evaluation
When: March 26-28, 2019
Where: University Park, Pa
Better Process Control School 2019
When: April 29 - May 2, 2019
Where: University Park, Pa
Food Microbiology Short Course 2019
When: May 21-23, 2019
Where: University Park, PA
Fundamentals of Food Science Short Course
When: June 3-6, 2019
Where: University Park, PA
Food and Airborne Fungi & Mycotoxins Short Course
When: June 11-13, 2019
Where: University Park, Pa