Foresters' use of management tool focus of Penn State study

July 25, 2018

Researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences examined the use and user-friendliness of SILVAH-Oak — short for Silviculture of Allegheny Hardwoods — a decision-support tool developed by the U.S. Forest Service for making silvicultural decisions in mixed oak forests.

Poor mental health days may cost the economy billions of dollars

July 19, 2018

Poor mental health may cost businesses nearly as much as physical health problems, according to researchers. A single extra poor mental health day in a month was associated with a 1.84 percent drop in the per capita real income growth rate, resulting in $53 billion less total income each year.

Link found between bitter-taste sensitivity and cancer risk

July 18, 2018

High bitter-taste sensitivity is associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer in older British women, according to researchers who conducted a unique study of 5,500 women whose diet, lifestyle and health has been tracked for about 20 years.

Study sheds new light on forests' response to atmospheric pollution

July 12, 2018

How forests respond to elevated nitrogen levels from atmospheric pollution is not always the same. While a forest is filtering nitrogen as expected, a higher percentage than previously seen is leaving the system again as the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, say researchers.

$500,000 grant to focus on how rural innovation happens, how to inspire more

July 11, 2018

Rural communities are often tied to agriculture, but finding new ways to inspire innovation in those communities may help create new companies, improve farming, and create more diverse economies. A $500,000 grant from USDA is aimed at doing that.

Research aims to prevent deaths related to gypsum-laced manure emissions

July 5, 2018

When gypsum — a source of sulfate — finds its way into low-oxygen manure-storage facilities via removal as soiled bedding, this innocuous product can turn into a deadly gas with a few moves of an agitation device, a dangerous threat that researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences believe can be counteracted with an additive.

Back to the future: Low-tech food-safety training still best for some audiences

July 2, 2018

While current training for food safety and sanitation usually incorporates high-technology presentations, such as videos and slide shows, there is still a need for low-tech approaches, according to Penn State researchers.

Gut microbes may partner with a protein to help regulate vitamin D

June 28, 2018

Microbes in the gut may use a protein in a process that helps the body regulate vitamin D production.

Climate projections suggest Lancaster County corn yields in jeopardy by 2050

June 25, 2018

Climate projections indicate more warming will occur in the Northeast than other sections of the United States, and that has implications for corn crops and dairy farms in the region by 2050, researchers warn.

'Nuru' becomes African farmers' newest ally against fall armyworm

June 25, 2018

Penn State researchers have joined forces with the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization to release the first app, called Nuru, to help African farmers recognize fall armyworm — a new and fast-spreading crop pest in sub-Saharan Africa — so that they can take immediate steps to destroy it and curb its spread.

Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in bees

June 21, 2018

An international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.

Lanternfly's penchant for -- and potential to harm -- grapevines focus of study

June 14, 2018

The spotted lanternfly is starting to sour the grape and wine industries in southeastern Pennsylvania, and research underway in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences aims to spoil the invasive pest's party.

Analysis of post-recession job trends suggests existence of 'two Pennsylvanias'

June 11, 2018

An analysis of employment change in the state since 2001 suggests the existence of "two Pennsylvanias" during the period from 2001 to 2017, according to economists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. The newly released report shows a sharp divide between southeastern Pennsylvania, with mainly job growth, and the rest of the state, with primarily job decline.

Dual-purpose wound dressing supported by $2 million NIH grant

June 5, 2018

Development of wound dressings made of semi-synthetic biomaterials will be the focus of a five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Once developed, this new kind of wound dressing would promote faster and more complete healing for the millions of people who suffer from skin wounds.

Oil and gas wastewater as dust suppressant less than ideal

May 30, 2018

At the least, wastewater from oil and gas drilling should be treated in a waste treatment facility before it is used on dirt roads to suppress dust or deice roads. At the best, affordable, nontoxic dust suppressants should be developed and used, according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers.

Climate change forced zombie ant fungi to adapt

May 29, 2018

Zombie ants clamp on to aerial vegetation and hang for months spewing the spores of their parasitic fungi, but researchers noticed that they do not always clamp on to the same part of the plant. Now the researchers know that the choice of leaves or twigs is related to climate and that climate change forced the fungi to adapt to local conditions.

Posttraumatic stress affects academics

May 28, 2018

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by traumatic military experiences is associated with feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness and/or guilt. New Penn State research is evaluating how PTSD symptoms increase risks for academic difficulties as well.

Wasp warriors: Entomologists on samurai mission to slay stink bugs

May 16, 2018

Hillary Peterson is every brown marmorated stink bug's worst nightmare. The Penn State doctoral degree student does not intend to rest professionally until she and other entomologists devise a way to reduce burgeoning populations of the invasive insect, originally from Asia, which are damaging crops and aggravating people. The goal of their research is to develop biological controls to interfere with the pest's reproduction.

Mending the Gap

May 15, 2018

Art, culture, sport, and a new kind of volunteer bring old and young together to strengthen the social fabric.

Penn State Master Gardener programs promote pollinator populations

May 14, 2018

Penn State Extension Master Gardeners across the state are helping to restore bee populations through their Pollinator Preferences and Pollinator-Friendly Gardener Certification programs.

Altered body odor indicates malaria even if microscope doesn't

May 14, 2018

Typhoid Mary may have infected a hundred or more people, but asymptomatic carriers of malaria infect far more people every year. An international team of researchers is working toward a way to identify malaria patients including infected individuals who show no malaria symptoms.

Crassweller receives society's Outstanding Extension Educator Award

May 14, 2018

Rob Crassweller, professor of horticulture and extension tree-fruit specialist in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, has received the 2018 American Society for Horticultural Science Outstanding Extension Educator Award.

Cocoa CRISPR: Gene editing shows promise for improving the 'chocolate tree'

May 9, 2018

Use of the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 could help to breed cacao trees that exhibit desirable traits such as enhanced resistance to diseases, according to Penn State plant scientists.

Virus inhibits immune response of caterpillars and plants

May 1, 2018

It is well known that certain wasps suppress the immune systems of their caterpillar hosts so they can successfully raise their young within those hosts. Now researchers at Penn State show that, in addition to suppressing caterpillar immune systems, wasps also suppress the defense mechanisms of the plants on which the caterpillars feed, which ensures that the caterpillars will continue to provide a suitable environment for the wasps' offspring.

Deer fawns more likely to survive in agricultural landscapes than forest

May 1, 2018

The cruel truth is that throughout the white-tailed deer's range only about half of all fawns live to see their first birthday — most are killed by predators. However, they have a much better chance of surviving if they are born in farmland rather than in forest, according to Penn State researchers, who collaborated with Pennsylvania Game Commission deer biologists.

Pennsylvania bear mange epidemic focus of Penn State and Game Commission project

April 25, 2018

Pennsylvania's black bear population is experiencing a mange epidemic, and a Penn State research team will work with the state Game Commission to gain a better understanding of the disease and develop strategies to manage it.

Undergraduate Exhibition wraps up record year

April 23, 2018

Hundreds of students and judges bustled about in the HUB-Robeson Center Wednesday evening for the 2018 Undergraduate Research Exhibition on the University Park campus of Penn State. From musical presentations in the Flex Theater posters in Alumni and Heritage halls, the University's best were promoting the fruits of their academic and artistic pursuits.

Andrew Read elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

April 18, 2018

Andrew Read, Evan Pugh University Professor of Biology and Entomology in the Eberly College of Science and the College of Agricultural Sciences, has been elected as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Penn State Extension, ag officials look to slow spread of spotted lanternfly

April 16, 2018

Grape growers, orchardists, nursery operators, homeowners and others in southeastern Pennsylvania are bracing for the spring emergence of the spotted lanternfly, an invasive insect from Asia that appeared for the first time in the United States in Berks County nearly four years ago. Penn State Extension educators and College of Agricultural Sciences researchers are working with state and federal agriculture officials to stop the pest's spread.

Doctoral student in plant pathology receives NSF research grant

April 13, 2018

Emma Rosenthal, a doctoral student in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, will be able to advance her research interests in plant pathology after receiving a grant from the National Science Foundation. The funding will support Rosenthal's research on bacterial leaf spot, a disease that infects lettuce plants.

Office for Research and Graduate Education

Address

217 Agricultural Administration Building
University Park, PA 16802-2600

Office for Research and Graduate Education

Address

217 Agricultural Administration Building
University Park, PA 16802-2600