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Integrated Health Solutions

Improving the health of humans, animals, and communities through research into preventative, corrective, diagnostic, and predictive solutions to the challenges presented by lifestyle, diseases, pests, and toxins.

Researchers in the college investigate the numerous ways in which the agricultural enterprise affects the health of ecosystems and people. Some of their goals include preventing the spread of infectious diseases; understanding how the host (animals, humans, plants, and insects) responds to environmental pressures; structuring the built environment to promote the selection of healthful food choices; and investigating environmentally sustainable techniques to grow high-quality, nutritious foods to serve a rapidly growing population.

Research Expertise

Research Videos

Penn State: Inspiring Collaboration
Penn State scientists find an inspiring collaboration. Dr. Prabhu, who specializes in the health benefits of fish oil, and Dr. Paulson, who is studying the stem cells that cause leukemia, connected their seemingly separate study areas during a weekly faculty lunch.

News

Anopheles mosquitoes could spread Mayaro virus in U.S., other diverse regions
November 12, 2018
Mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are well known as primary vectors of malaria. But a new study suggests that Anopheles species, including some found in the United States, also are capable of carrying and transmitting an emerging pathogen, Mayaro virus, which has caused outbreaks of disease in South America and the Caribbean.
Farmers market vendors need training to improve food-safety practices
November 1, 2018
Many vendors at farmers markets take inadequate precautions to prevent the spread of foodborne illness, and they should be trained to reduce food-safety risks, according to Penn State researchers who completed the final phase of an innovative five-year study.
Climate change not main driver of amphibian decline
October 25, 2018
While a warming climate in recent decades may be a factor in the waning of some local populations of frogs, toads, newts and salamanders, it cannot explain the overall steep decline of amphibians, according to researchers.