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Advanced Agricultural and Food Systems

Transforming thinking and practice in agricultural and food systems through research focused on productivity, sustainability, and adaptability.

Food is critical to sustain life, but rather than simply producing more food for a growing world population, it is imperative that we also produce better foods that increase production efficiencies while using fewer resources.

Agricultural systems must also adapt to a changing climate. Consequently, researchers in the college are investigating the ways in which climate change will affect local weather and resulting land use. These scientists are particularly interested in examining the issue of global climate change at scales from large to regional and how information can be shared across these different scales.

Research Expertise

Research Videos

Inspiring Research: Honey Bees
Whole colonies are dying in record numbers. Why the bees are dying is a mystery. Penn State, one of the country's leading honey bee research facilities, has been investigating the problem.

News

'Right' cover-crop mix good for both Chesapeake and bottom lines
April 29, 2019
Planting and growing a strategic mix of cover crops not only reduces the loss of nitrogen from farm fields, protecting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, but the practice also contributes nitrogen to subsequent cash crops, improving yields, according to researchers.
Insect-deterring sorghum compounds may be eco-friendly pesticide
April 3, 2019
Compounds produced by sorghum plants to defend against insect feeding could be isolated, synthesized and used as a targeted, nontoxic insect deterrent, according to researchers who studied plant-insect interactions that included field, greenhouse and laboratory components.
Manure application changes with winter crop can cut nitrogen loss, boost profits
April 2, 2019
Dairy farmers in the Northeast can improve water quality and boost the profitability of their operations by changing the timing and method of applying manure to their fields in the fall, along with planting rye as a cover crop between corn crops — or by double-cropping rye and corn, according to Penn State researchers.