A Commitment to Scientific Discovery and Solutions

Scientists in the College of Agricultural Sciences are seeking solutions to the agricultural and ecological problems of our time by conducting basic and applied research focusing on cross-cutting thematic areas.

Advanced Agricultural and Food Systems
Transforming thinking and practice in agricultural and food systems through research focused on productivity, sustainability, and adaptability.
Biologically-Based Materials and Products
Discovering novel approaches using genetic systems and biological materials to create value-added commercial and consumer products in a sustainable, profitable manner.
Community Resilience and Capacity
Helping communities improve their economic resilience, create sustainable infrastructures, and promote their local economy through value-added opportunities and new business development.
Environmental Resilience
Providing innovative research to enhance and protect managed and natural ecosystems, ecosystem services and human well-being.
Global Engagement
Advancing global solutions to challenges in agriculture, health and sustainability that impact the future of an interconnected world.
Integrated Health Solutions
Improving the health of humans, animals, and communities through research into preventative, corrective, diagnostic, and predictive solutions to the challenges presented by lifestyle, diseases, pests, and toxins.

Research News

Graduate Student Travel Awards
July 19, 2018
These awards should be used for presenting original research at national or international meetings. Please note that either an oral or poster presentation is required to be eligible for these funds. One travel award per degree is allowed. Awards are limited to $500 for domestic travel and international travel.
Research aims to prevent deaths related to gypsum-laced manure emissions
July 5, 2018
Gypsum recycled from manufacturing and construction waste has gained popularity as a bedding source for the dairy industry. However, when gypsum — a source of sulfate — finds its way into low-oxygen manure-storage facilities via removal as soiled bedding, this innocuous product can turn into a deadly gas with a few moves of an agitation device, a dangerous threat that researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences believe can be counteracted with an additive.
Back to the future: Low-tech food-safety training still best for some audiences
July 2, 2018
While current training for food safety and sanitation usually incorporates high-technology presentations, such as videos and slide shows, there is still a need for low-tech approaches, according to Penn State researchers.

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