As a student in 2012, Fengchun "Spring" Yang placed second in Ag Springboard, then figured out how to sustain a healthy population of black soldier flies. Symton BSF, the startup he founded, was featured this month in the Washington Post.

Fengchun "Spring" Yang, founder of Symton BSF, tends black soldier flies in September 2013 as a senior at the College of Agricultural Sciences.

Fengchun "Spring" Yang, founder of Symton BSF, tends black soldier flies in September 2013 as a senior at the College of Agricultural Sciences.

Fengchun "Spring" Yang developed production methods for black soldier flies while a student here at the College of Agricultural Sciences. Black soldier flies are rich in fat and protein and can quickly turn manure into compost.

Yang placed second at Ag Springboard 2012, the business pitch contest for Penn State ag sciences students.

He went onto found Symton BSF, the company dedicated to providing the best quality black soldier fly products and becoming the "go-to place for all things black soldier fly."

The Washington Post featured Symton July 3 in its business section in a story by Christopher Ingraham: Maggots: A taste of food's future.

"The black soldier fly's remarkable ability to transform nearly any kind of organic waste into protein could revolutionize global food supplies," wrote the Post.

Learn about Yang's black soldier fly work as a senior and winner of Ag Springboard in this 2013 story from the E&I archive.