CEDEV 505: Leadership Development (3 credits). Exploration, understanding, and application of leadership roles, strategies, and principles in group and community settings.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Instructor

Dr. Brad Woods

Brad R. Woods, Ph.D.
Research Integrity Officer
Executive Director, Office of Research Integrity
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box 451092
Las Vegas, NV 89154-1092
E-mail: Use the Canvas Inbox

Generally, my response to your e-mail will occur on the same business day (if received during normal business hours). Occasionally, however, due to travel and/or work commitments, it may take me slightly longer. If you do not receive a response from me within 48 business hours, please resend your e-mail.

Course Overview

This course focuses on understanding leadership, from its practical and theoretical applications, within the context of community. Additionally, we will explore the organizational literature to better enable us, as community and economic development practitioners, to understand emerging trends that will facilitate development in and of a community. Given the nature of community and economic development, much of our readings are drawn from applied fields and rely heavily on case studies. Through these readings, you will be able to better understand how theory is applied in "real-world" situations and gain further insight into how best to work with community leadership within your own context. Through the use of class discussion, students will share examples of working with community leaders or other leadership experiences; reflect critically on the literature, including identification of notable strengths and weaknesses; share thoughtful critiques of others' posts, and provide insightful commentary on discussion forum questions or questions asked by colleagues. Information on the class syllabus may be changed during the semester to better serve class learning needs.

The seminar includes "Modules" which are the World Campus equivalent of classes for students in residence. Each module is the equivalent of a week of class content and activities. The average time for completing the reading and activities for a module is about 12-15 hours.

Course requirements include completing assigned readings, participating in asynchronous online class discussions, and compiling four reflective essays.

Course Objectives

The goal of this course is to help you think critically about recent research on leadership topics. By the end of this seminar you will be able to:

  • Understand how leadership applies to and fosters community and economic development.
  • Apply the concepts in a holistic and an applied manner.
  • Develop skills for identifying community leaders.
  • Develop a personal approach to working with community leaders to better understand how successful community and economic development can be achieved.

This is a graduate seminar and therefore we will largely rely on readings and discussion as a means to familiarize you with topics in the community and leadership bodies of literature. Your learning depends on your participation and your personal engagement in the topic. Class discussion forum postings are designed to encourage an expression of your opinions and observations, to share experiences, and to ask questions. Primary assessment will be derived from your performance on four Reflective Essays. A grading/instructional rubric, which provides guidance on successful preparation is provided.

I will be looking for evidence that you understand your own unique capabilities and the importance of bringing your own qualities to this course. There are no "right answers" in our class discussions and your degree of personal and collective insight will determine success.

It is important to develop one's own personalized sense of self; reflecting on your own values and beliefs should help you identify ways in which to apply your own strengths to community leadership situations. I have designed this class to set the stage for students to take responsibility for their own learning rather than dictating content for students to learn.

Course Outline

For due dates, refer to the Course Summary on the Syllabus page in Canvas.

Required Course Materials

Textbook: *Lohmann, R. A., & Van, T. J. (2011). Resolving community conflicts and problems: Public deliberation and sustained dialogue. New York: Columbia University Press., ISBN: 9780231151689

Willink, J., & Babin, L. (2015). Extreme ownership: How u.s. navy seals lead and win (1st ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press.

*E-Book Option: An online version of this text is available at no cost as a Penn State Library E-Book. You can access the E-Book through the Library Resources link on the course navigation. Some E-Books will only be available online, while others will be available to download in full or in part. You may choose to use the E-Book as an alternative to purchasing a physical copy of the text. For questions or issues, you can contact the University Libraries Reserve Help ().

Readings

Module 1: Welcome to the Course

Brown, R.B. and A.B. Nylander. 1998. Community Leadership Structure: Differences Between Rural Community Leaders' and Residents' Informational Networks. Journal of the Community Development Society 29(1):71-89.

Israel G.D. and L.J. Beaulieu. 1990. "Community Leadership" Pp. 181-202 in American Rural Communities, edited by A.E. Luloff and L.E. Swanson. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Til, J.V. 2011. "The Structure of Sustained Dialogue and Public Deliberation" Pp. 15-32 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Module 2: Community, Collaboration, and Leadership

Avolio, B.J., F.R. Walumbwa, and T.J. Weber. 2009. Leadership: Current Theories, Research and Future Directions. Annual Review of Psychology 60:421-449.

Garkovich, L. 1992. "Weaving the Fabric of Tomorrow's Communities" Pp. 305-316 in Multicommunity Collaboration: An Evolving Rural Revitalization Strategy, Conference Proceedings, edited by P.F. Korsching, T.O. Borich, and J. Stewart. North Central Regional Center for Rural Development.

Pigg, K.E. 1999. Community Leadership and Community Theory: A Practical Synthesis. Journal of the Community Development Society 30(2):196-212.

Wilkinson, K.P. 1992. "The Process of Emergence of Multicommunity Collaboration" Pp. 259-264 in Multicommunity Collaboration: An Evolving Rural Revitalization Strategy, Conference Proceedings, edited by P.F. Korsching, T.O. Borich, and J. Stewart. North Central Regional Center for Rural Development.

Suggested:

Kaufman, H.F. 1959. Toward an Interactional Conception of Community. Social Forces 38:8-17.

Vugt, M.V., R. Hogan, and R.B. Kaiser. 2008. Leadership, Followership and Evolution -- Some Lessons from the Past. American Psychologist 63(3):182-196.

Wilkinson, K.P. 1999. "Rural Community Development." Pp. 81-92 in The Community in Rural America. Middleton: Social Ecology Press.

Module 3: Community Agency, Capacity, and Action

Abah, O.S. 2007. Vignettes of Communities in Action: An Exploration of Participatory Methodologies in Promoting Community Development in Nigeria. Community Development Journal 42(4):435-448.

Brennan, M.A. and A.E. Luloff. 2007. Exploring Rural Community Agency Differences in Ireland and Pennsylvania. Journal of Rural Studies 23:52-61.

Donnermeyer, J., B. Plested, R. Edwards, G. Oetting, and L. Littlethunder. 1997. Assessing Community Readiness for Prevention. Journal of the Community Development Society 28(1):65-83.

Emery, M., E. Fernandez, I. Gutierrez-Montes, and C. Flora. 2007. Leadership as Community Capacity Building: A Study on the Impact of Leadership Development Training on Community. Journal of the Community Development Society 38(4):60-70.

Granovetter, M.S. 1973. The Strength of Weak Ties. The American Journal of Sociology 78:1360-1380.

Luloff, A.E. and J.C. Bridger. 2003. "Community Agency and Local Development." Pp. 203-213 in Challenges for Rural America in the Twenty-First Century, edited by D.L. Brown and L.E. Swanson. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press.

Suggested:

Flora, C.B. and J.L. Flora. 2003. "Social Capital." Pp. 215-227 in Challenges for Rural America in the Twenty-First Century, edited by D.L. Brown and L.E. Swanson. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press.

Richards R. T. and R. L. Brod. 2004. Community Support for a Gold Cyanide Process Mine: Resident and Leader Differences in Rural Montana. Rural Sociology 69:552-575.

Module 4: Sustained Dialogue and Public Deliberation in Application

Molotch, H. 1976. The City as a Growth Machine: Toward a Political Economy of Place. American Journal of Sociology 82:309-332.

Robinson, D. 2011. "Sustained Dialogue and Public Deliberation: Making the Connection" Pp. 61-76 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Saunders, H.H. and R.N. Parker. 2011. "The Sustained Dialogue Model: Transforming Relationships, Designing Change" Pp. 33-42 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Saunders, H.H. and R.N. Parker. 2011. "Sustained Dialogue in Action" Pp. 43-60 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Module 5: Sustained Dialogue in Application

Acheson, N. and C. Milofsky. 2011. "Derry Exceptionalism and an Organic Model of Sustained Dialogue" Pp. 167-185 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Gamson, W.A. 1966. Rancorous Conflict in Community Politics. American Sociological Review. 31:71-81.

Nolan, J., N. Conti, and C. Colyer. 2011. "A Public Safety Process: Sustained Dialogue for Situational Policing" Pp. 195-121 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Nolan, J. J. Kirby, and R. Althouse. 2011. "Facilitating Neighborhood Growth: A Commonsense Approach to Public Safety from the Relational Paradigm" Pp. 213-232 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Module 6: Public Deliberation in Application

Eser, S.G. and A.E. Luloff. 2003. Community Controversy Over a Proposed Limestone Quarry. Society & Natural Resources 16:793-806.

Lohmann, R. 2011. "Deliberation and Dialogue and Commons Theory" Pp. 264-274 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Ludeman, R. and E. Gelles. 2011. "Question Mapping: A Method for Organizing and Sustaining Dialogue" Pp. 277-291 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Ryfe, D. 2011. "The Deliberative Posture" Pp. 235-253 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Williams, D. 2011. "Public Deliberation and Dialogue in Public Management" Pp. 254-263 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Suggested:

Gaventa J. 1982. "Part I. Introduction and Chapter 1. Power and Participation." Pp. 1-32 in Power and Powerlessness: Quiescence and Rebellion in an Appalachian Valley. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.

Carroll, M.S., L.L. Higgins, P.J. Cohn, and J. Burchfield. 2006. Community wildfire events as a source of social conflict. Rural Sociology 71:261-280.

Module 7: Entrepreneurial Leadership and Economic Development

Gupta, V., I.C. MacMillan, and G. Surie. 2004. Entrepreneurial Leadership: Developing and Measuring a Cross-Cultural Construct. Journal of Business Venturing 19:241-260.

Feldman, M.P. 2014. The Character of innovative places: Entrepreneurial Strategy, Economic Development, and Prosperity. Small Business Economics 43:9-20.

Shaffer, R., S. Deller, and D. Marcouiller. 2006. Rethinking Community Economic Development. Economic Development Quarterly 20(1):59-74.

Flora, C.B. and J.L. Flora. 1993. Entrepreneurial Social Infrastructure: A Necessary Ingredient. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 529:48-58.

Bridger J.C. and A.J. Harp. 1990. Ideology and Growth Promotion. Journal of Rural Studies 6(3):269-277.

Suggested:

Reese, L.A. and R.A. Rosenfeld. 2002. "Modeling Local Economic Development Policy." Pp.109-143 in The Civic Culture of Local Economic Development. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Korsching, P.F., J.C. Allen, R. Vogt, and S.G. Sapp. 2007. Community Leaders, Business Ownership, and Support of Entrepreneurship Development: The Role of Macroentrepreneurs. Community Development 38(4):28-45.

Module 8: Volunteerism

Cnaan, R.A., F. Handy, and M. Wadsworth. 1996. Defining Who is a Volunteer: Conceptual and Empirical Considerations. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 25:364-383.

Meier, A., L. Singletary, and G. Hill. 2012. Measuring the Impacts of a Volunteer-Based Community Development Program in Developing Volunteers' Leadership Skills. Journal of Extension 50(2):2RIB1.

Jones, K.S. 2006. Giving and Volunteering as Distinct Forms of Civic Engagement: The Role of Community Integration and Personal Resources in Formal Helping. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 35:249-266.

Brennan, M.A. Placing Volunteers at the Center of Community Development. 2007. The International Journal of Volunteer Administration 24(4):5-13.

Suggested:

Borden, L.M. and D.F. Perkins. 2007. The Roles Volunteers Can Fill in Community-wide Efforts. The International Journal of Volunteer Administration 24(4)14-23.

Module 9: Virtual Community Role Play

Any/all materials needed for this module will be provided by the instructor at the beginning of the module.

Module 10: Organizations and Nonprofits

Adams, C.T. and F.D. Perlmutter. 1995. Leadership in Hard Times: Are Nonprofits Well-Served?. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 24:253-262.

Carman, J.G. 2011. What You Don't Know Can Hurt Your Community: Lessons from a Local United Way. Nonprofit Management and Leadership 21(4):433-448.

EarthOutreach. 2009. Harnessing Coal River Wind in Appalachia. Accessed 29-April-2014 from http://youtu.be/vIwO9Z3IlRo.

Inglis, S. T. Alexander, and L. Weaver. 1999. Roles and Responsibilities of Community Nonprofit Boards. Nonprofit Management and Leadership 10(2):153-167.

Medley, B.C. and O.H. Akan. 2008. Creating Positive Change in Community Organizations: A Case for Rediscovering Lewin. Nonprofit Management and Leadership 18(4):485-496.

Mays, W. Appalachian Voices. Google Earth Outreach. Accessed 29-April-2014 from http://www.google.com/earth/outreach/stories/app_voices.html.

Reece, E. 2009. Hell Yeah, We Want Windmills: A Plan to Supplant Mountaintop Removal Mining With a Wind Farm. Orion Magazine. Accessed 29-April 2014 from http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/4809/.

Suggested:

Carman, J.G. 2001. Community Foundations: A Growing Resource for Community Development. Nonprofit Management and Leadership 12(1):7-24.

Module 11: Future Directions for Community Leadership

Til, J.V. and D. Ford 2011. "The Future of Deliberation and Dialogue Studies." Pp. 333-334 in Resolving Community Conflict and Problems, edited by R.A. Lohmann and J.V. Til. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

USDA-Forest Service. 2006. The Public and Wildland Fire Management: Social Science Findings for Managers. General Technical Report. Northern Research Station: Newtown Square, PA.

Robert L. Ryan and Elisabeth M. Hamin, Engaging Communities in Post-Fire Restoration: Forest Treatments and Community-Agency Relations after the Cerro Grande Fire. Pp. 87-96.

Erika A. Lang, Kristen C. Nelson, and Pamela Jakes, Working with Community Leadership to Promote Wildfire Preparedness. Pp. 137-150.

Brad R. Weisshaupt, Matthew S. Carroll, Keith A. Blatner, and Pamela J. Jakes, Using Focus Groups to Involve Citizens in Resource Management--Investigating Perceptions of Smoke as a Barrier to Prescribed Forest Burning., Pp.177-186.

Center for Rural Affairs--Leadership (review linked page and browse remainder).

Suggested Readings:

Shuman, M.H. 1998. "Pro-Community Local Governance." Pp. 123-151 in Going Local: Creating Self-Reliant Communities in a Global Age. New York, NY: The Free Press.

Shuman, M.H. 1998. "Making History." Pp. 177-200 in Going Local: Creating Self-Reliant Communities in a Global Age. New York, NY: The Free Press.

Module 12: Virtual Community Role Play

A continuation of Module 9: Any/all materials needed for this module will be provided by the instructor at the beginning of the module.

Grading

Please Note: All written assignments (except discussion posts) should be double-spaced.

Four Reflective Essays: 60% (15% each)

Reflective essays should demonstrate your ability to understand and synthesize the concepts presented in the course readings. You should be critical of the literature, but able to ground your views based on said literature. An acceptable reflective essay identifies key points that emerge across the weekly readings as a theme and relates it to some facet of community and economic development. Please note, whether you agree or disagree with a particular reading is immaterial; your ability to rationalize your argument through carefully selected quotes and citations will be evidence of a "good" essay. A grading rubric is provided in Canvas.

  • Reflective Essay 1, covering Modules 1-3
  • Reflective Essay 2, covering Modules 4-6
  • Reflective Essay 3, covering Modules 7-9
  • Reflective Essay 4, a cumulative essay covering content from three modules

Discussion Group Participation: 10%

A grading rubric for discussion participation and group assignment expectations is provided in Canvas. In addition to providing expectations for a thoughtful discussion, this document contains additional information that will be useful in enriching the class discussion. It is expected you provide thoughtful and timely commentary. Discussion postings are due as specified in your Canvas Syllabus under the Course Summary heading.

Virtual Community Role Play: 10%

Discussions for this assignment will focus on an applied case study scenario, drawn from real-world example(s). Here, your task is to select the role of a community leader persona (mayor, representative of a nonprofit, religious leader, postmaster, etc.) and advocate/debate the posted scenario. In completing this task, you should represent the interests of your persona, while also remembering how to apply the lessons, skills, and insights drawn from previous modules. Details concerning specific scenarios will be provided at the beginning of the module.

Book Review: 20%

Grading Scale

GradePercentagePoints
A 100 - 93 100 - 93
A- <93 - 90 <93 - 90
B+ <90 - 87 <90 - 87
B <87 - 83 <87 - 83
B- <83 - 80 <83 - 80
C+ <80 - 77 <80 - 77
C <77 - 70 <77 - 70
D <70 - 60 <70 - 60
F <60 <60

Due to the effort I expend in providing you with comments, suggestions, edits, and my evaluation of your reflective essays, you should expect my response and grade within 7 business day following the due date of the essay. Feedback and evaluation of your discussion forum posts begin at the start of the next module. For example, review of your post(s) on Module 2 will begin at the start of Module 3. You should expect my feedback and evaluation within 7 business days from the start of the next module.

NOTE: If you are planning to graduate this semester, please communicate your intent to graduate to your instructor. This will alert your instructor to the need to submit your final grade in time to meet the published graduation deadlines. For more information about graduation policies and deadlines, please see "Graduation" under World Campus Student Policies.

Course Requirements

This course will incorporate a mixture of discussion, case study analysis, and small group work. I encourage value and expect your preparation, participation, attention, reflection, and attendance. My expectations for students include:

  1. Academic Integrity: Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly activity in an open, honest and responsible manner. The University's Code of Conduct states that all students should act with personal integrity, respect other students' dignity, rights, and property, and help create and maintain an environment in which all can succeed through the fruits of their efforts. Academic integrity includes a commitment not to engage in or tolerate acts of falsification, misrepresentation or deception. Such acts of dishonesty violate the fundamental ethical principles of the University community and compromise the worth of work completed by others. University Faculty Senate Policy 49-20 concerning Academic Dishonesty, and as spelled out in the Student Guide to University Policies and Rules, applies to this course: Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarizing, fabricating of information or citations, facilitating acts of academic dishonesty by others, having unauthorized possession of examinations, submitting work of another person or work previously used without informing the instructor, or tampering with the academic work of other students.
  2. Come to class prepared, having done the readings and other assignments.
  3. Submit assignments on or before the due date indicated. No late assignments will be graded unless you have discussed extenuating circumstances with me before the assignment deadline.
  4. Exhibit willingness to engage with others in a respectful manner.
  5. Ask questions of the instructor and your classmates that contribute to the learning of the entire class.

Technical Requirements

This course is offered online and it assumed you possess the minimum system requirements and computing skills to participate effectively. A list of technical requirements is listed on the World Campus' Penn State Technical Requirements page.

Minimum Skills

  • You should have an understanding of basic computer usage (creating folders/directories, switching between programs, formatting and backing up media, accessing the Internet).
  • You must be able to conduct word processing tasks such as creating, editing, saving, and retrieving documents.
  • You must be able to use a web browser to open web pages, download files, and search the Internet.
  • You must be able to use an e-mail program to send and receive messages and to attach and download documents/files.
  • You must be able to download and install programs or plug-ins from the Internet.

Accessibility Information

  • Accessibility statement for Canvas.

Netiquette

The term "Netiquette" refers to the etiquette guidelines for electronic communications, such as e-mail and discussion postings. Netiquette covers not only rules to maintain civility in discussions, but also special guidelines unique to the electronic nature of messages. Please review Virginia Shea's "The Core Rules of Netiquette" for general guidelines that should be followed when communicating in this course.

Support Services

As a World Campus student, you have access to a variety of services and resources, including advising, tutoring, library services, career services, and more. Please visit the World Campus Student Services page for more information.

If you experience technology problems of any kind in Canvas, please select the Help icon and select "Report a Canvas Problem," "Chat with Support," or "Call Support." It is in your own best interest to be as specific as you possibly can. Vague descriptions of a problem only delay assistance. Try to include information such as: the specific course page, quiz question, etc. you were on; what you attempted to do when that failed; the exact language of any error message displayed on your screen; the date and time when your problem occurred; and any other pertinent information (does the problem happen consistently and always in the same way, etc.).

Online Students Use of the Library

As Penn State World Campus students, you have access to many of the materials that the library offers to students. The library website has a lot to offer, but can be overwhelming. A guide has been created to serve as your introduction to important library resources, services, and important pages within the library. The Online Student Library Guide is updated regularly by the online librarian and is intended to provide a level of comfort through an introduction to help you feel comfortable navigating the library website to find valuable information for your coursework.

Penn State Policies

Log-In Policy

Students are expected to log-in regularly to keep up-to-date with announcements, discussions, etc. The class will progress at a regular pace throughout the semester and there are specific due dates and times for assignments, etc.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly activity in an open, honest and responsible manner. Academic integrity is a basic guiding principle for all academic activity at The Pennsylvania State University, and all members of the University community are expected to act in accordance with this principle. Consistent with this expectation, students should act with personal integrity, respect other students' dignity, rights, and property, and help create and maintain an environment in which all can succeed through the fruits of their efforts. Academic integrity includes a commitment not to engage in or tolerate acts of falsification, misrepresentation or deception. Such acts of dishonesty violate the fundamental ethical principles of the University community and compromise the worth of work completed by others (see Faculty Senate Policy 49-20, G-9 Procedures and the Code of Conduct).

Read the Academic Integrity Guidelines for the College of Agricultural Sciences

A lack of knowledge or understanding of the University's Academic Integrity policy and the types of actions it prohibits and/or requires does not excuse one from complying with the policy. Penn State and the College of Agricultural Sciences take violations of academic integrity very seriously. Faculty, alumni, staff and fellow students expect each student to uphold the University's standards of academic integrity both inside and outside of the classroom.

Educational Equity Statement

Penn State takes great pride to foster a diverse and inclusive environment for students, faculty, and staff. Acts of intolerance, discrimination, or harassment due to age, ancestry, color, disability, gender, gender identity, national origin, race, religious belief, sexual orientation, or veteran status are not tolerated and can be reported through Educational Equity at the Report Bias webpage.

Copyright Notice

All course materials students receive or to which students have online access are protected by copyright laws. Students may use course materials and make copies for their own use as needed, but unauthorized distribution and/or uploading of materials without the instructor's express permission is strictly prohibited. University Policy AD 40, the University Policy Recording of Classroom Activities and Note Taking Services addresses this issue. Students who engage in the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials may be held in violation of the University's Code of Conduct, and/or liable under Federal and State laws.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

Many students at Penn State face personal challenges or have psychological needs that may interfere with interfere with their academic progress, social development, or emotional wellbeing. The university offers a variety of confidential services to help you through difficult times, including individual and group counseling, crisis intervention, consultations, online chats, and mental health screenings. These services are provided by staff who welcome all students and embrace a philosophy respectful of clients’ cultural and religious backgrounds, and sensitive to differences in race, ability, gender identity and sexual orientation.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
Penn State Crisis Line (24 hours/7 days/week)
Crisis Text Line (24 hours/7 days/week)
Mental Health Services

(814) 863-0395
(877) 229-6400
Text LIONS to 741741

Accommodations for Persons with Disabilities

Penn State welcomes students with disabilities into the University's educational programs. Every Penn State campus has an office for students with disabilities. The Student Disability Resources Web site provides contact information for every Penn State campus. For further information, please visit the Student Disability Resources Web site.

In order to receive consideration for reasonable accommodations, you must contact the appropriate disability services office at the campus where you are officially enrolled, participate in an intake interview, and provide documentation. If the documentation supports your request for reasonable accommodations, your campus's disability services office will provide you with an accommodation letter. Please share this letter with your instructors and discuss the accommodations with them as early in your courses as possible. You must follow this process for every semester that you request accommodations.

Accommodations for Military Personnel

Veterans and currently serving military personnel and/or spouses with unique circumstances (e.g., upcoming deployments, drill/duty requirements, disabilities, VA appointments, etc.) are welcome and encouraged to communicate these, in advance if possible, to the instructor in the case that special arrangements need to be made.

Use of Trade Names

Where trade names are used, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by the World Campus, Outreach and Cooperative Extension, the College of Agricultural Sciences, or The Pennsylvania State University is implied.

Subject to Change Statement

Please note that this Course Syllabus is subject to change. Students are responsible for abiding by such changes.