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March 2, 2016

Penn State's Center for Sports Surface Research is collaborating with the National Football League to monitor an online database about turfgrass to help keep professional athletes safe on game day.

March 2, 2016

For Pennsylvania dairy farmers, producing feed grain on-farm requires significantly less energy than importing it from the Midwest, according to Penn State researchers whose findings may help dairy farmers save energy and money in the face of rising feed costs.

February 25, 2016

A team of researchers, led by scientists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, will launch a project designed to improve nutrition and empower women in Cambodia.

February 22, 2016

Jeffrey Catchmark, associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering at Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, is working to commercialize a patent-pending biofoam pad for wound and trauma care.

February 22, 2016

After decades of research aimed at improving the yield, appearance and safety of fruits, vegetables and grains, it's time to focus science on the health benefits those foods can provide, according to a cancer researcher in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

February 22, 2016

Six projects have received funding from Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences under its Strategic Initiatives and Networks Program, which aims to increase the capacity for interdisciplinary research by strengthening existing programs and promoting formation of new interdisciplinary research partnerships.

February 8, 2016

To help tackle the complexities of infectious disease dynamics, Penn State has developed an interdisciplinary approach to disease research, bringing together a diverse team of theoreticians and empirical scientists — representing such disparate fields as molecular biology, mathematics, plant pathology, entomology, genomics, statistics, physics, population dynamics and more — under a single umbrella. Now entering its 13th year in existence, Penn State's Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics has become a global leader in infectious disease research.

February 8, 2016

Invasive species, such as gypsy moth and emerald ash borer, have had devastating effects on Pennsylvania's forests, and the keys to combating these threats are active management, collaboration and research, according to U.S. Rep. Glenn Thompson. Thompson made his remarks during a forum on invasive forest species that he sponsored Feb. 5 on Penn State's University Park campus.

January 19, 2016

A Penn State research study may soon have a better understanding of how to balance woodland creatures' effect on forest vegetation.

January 19, 2016

Catherine Cutter, professor of food science and food safety extension specialist focusing on muscle foods, has been named recipient of the Arthur W. Nesbitt Faculty Program Development Award in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

January 8, 2016

Penn State graduate students and visiting scientists from other institutions play a critical role in many studies conducted at Penn State's Fruit Research and Extension Center in Biglerville, Adams County. And now, thanks to the financial support of the State Horticultural Association of Pennsylvania, new graduate-student housing at the center will help ensure those contributions into the future.

January 4, 2016

The Office of Research and Graduate Education is now accepting proposals for the Crouch Endowment. The purpose of these funds are to support research in Viticulture, Enology, or Pomology and to support students studying in these areas.

December 17, 2015

Despite modern technology, the first line of defense against famine-inducing crop diseases is still the keen eyes of farmers around the world, many of whom do not have access to advanced diagnostics and treatment advice. To address this problem, scientists are releasing 50,000 open-access images of infected and healthy crop plants, with an eye toward developing a smartphone app that can automatically diagnose a crop disease.

December 17, 2015

Recognizing the need to improve food security and enhance the well-being of rural populations in developing countries, a new Penn State project will provide intensive training for researchers that will help them to integrate gender-related dimensions into international agricultural research.

December 17, 2015

Two Penn State researchers have been chosen to receive a grant through the Grand Challenges Explorations program, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Johanna Ohm, graduate student in biology, and Matt Thomas, professor and Huck Scholar in Ecological Entomology, will develop an insect-based artificial diet for adult Aedes/Anopheles mosquitoes as a viable alternative to mammalian blood meals.

December 17, 2015

These are not your grandfather's dairy cows. In 2014, the United States national dairy herd produced twice as much milk as it did 90 years ago, but with about 60 percent fewer cows.

December 17, 2015

Dicamba herbicide drift onto plants growing adjacent to farm fields causes significant delays in flowering, as well as reduced flowering, of those plants, and results in decreased visitation by honey bees, according to researchers at Penn State and the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture.

December 17, 2015

In collaboration with partners in Europe and Africa, researchers at Penn State have received a five-year, $10.2-million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to investigate a new method for preventing the transmission of malaria. The method involves limiting mosquito access to houses by blocking openings and installing "eave tubes" that contain a unique type of insecticide-laced mosquito netting developed by Dutch partner In2Care that kills the insects as they attempt to enter.

December 17, 2015

A bile acid that can turn off a receptor in the gut has prevented and reversed fatty liver disease in mice, according to an international team of researchers. The compound may help treat certain metabolic disorders, such as Type 2 diabetes and

November 12, 2015

Troy Ott, professor of reproductive physiology in the College of Agricultural Sciences, is developing a blood test that dairy farmers and livestock veterinarians can use to tell whether a cow failed to conceive after insemination.