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PASTO Ag Museum opens for the season Sunday afternoon, April 13th at 1pm

Posted: July 14, 2014

LOAD UP YOUR WAGONS AND HEAD TO THE PASTO AG MUSEUM THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON!
Thousands of pioneers traveled through the City of Rocks on their way to Oregon and California.   This National Park Service photo shows one wagon train on the road leading up to the granite spires.

Thousands of pioneers traveled through the City of Rocks on their way to Oregon and California. This National Park Service photo shows one wagon train on the road leading up to the granite spires.

Join us this Sunday afternoon, April 13th from 1pm to 4pm as we open the season, extend Blue-White Weekend, and look at the items that would have been packed in the wagons of early pioneers.

 

See and touch personal and household items, tools, tin ware, cast iron, wooden utensils and more! Try on an oxen yoke! Understand what food was required for the 6 month journey, how it was preserved, and prepared. Appreciate the decisions that would have been made by those setting out – expecting never to return – about what to take and what to leave behind.

 

The Pasto Ag Museum offers tours that connect with history and sciences lessons in the elementary school curriculum. We offer special experiences tailored to the history of “Westward Expansion” and the “Oregon Trail”. On display this weekend will be items from our collection that are examples of the things that early pioneers packed in their wagons as they headed west to Oregon and California.

 

The Oregon Trail is a 2,200-mile (3,500 km) historic east-west large wheeled wagon route and emigrant trail that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon. From the early to mid-1830s (and particularly through the epoch years; 1846–1869) the Oregon Trail and its many offshoots were used by about 400,000 settlers, ranchers, farmers, miners, and businessmen and their families. The eastern half of the trail was also used by travelers on the California Trail (from 1843), Bozeman Trail (from 1863), and Mormon Trail (from 1847) before turning off to their separate destinations. Use of the trail declined as the first transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, making the trip west substantially faster, cheaper, and safer. Today, modern highways such as Interstate 80 follow the same course westward and pass through towns originally established to service the Oregon Trail. Source: Wikipedia