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Latest news from the Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.
University leaders are renewing their plea to Penn Staters and others, asking them to urge Pennsylvania legislators to release the University's state funds.
October 12, 2017

University leaders are renewing their plea to Penn Staters and others, asking them to urge Pennsylvania legislators to release the University's state funds. Without critical state funding, Penn State would be forced to make "dramatic cuts and raise tuition, perhaps even for the upcoming spring semester."

October 10, 2017

This year, two graduate students from Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, Ilse Huerta and Celize Christy, will represent the University at World Food Prize events in Des Moines, Iowa, Oct. 18-20.

October 9, 2017

Five new faculty members have joined the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences in the College of Agricultural Sciences.

Penn State's new Center for Security Research and Education will support and promote the University’s research, teaching and public outreach programs related to security, with scholars from diverse disciplines pursuing interdisciplinary research and solutions to contemporary security challenges.
October 9, 2017

Penn State has announced the creation of a new center designed to bring together the University’s many strengths in all aspects of national, homeland and global security. The new Center for Security Research and Education incorporates 10 Penn State colleges, schools and research units to focus a broad range of academic endeavor on society’s most critical threats.

For part of her research on nutrition in Bangladesh, Emily Seiger sat in on 50 interviews with the mothers involved with the food safety study. The mothers were asked about hand-washing techniques, food storage, and their child’s eating habits outside of the home. 
October 9, 2017

Emily Seiger, a community, environment and development major in the College of Agricultural Sciences, is gaining insight into problems related to food safety, hygiene and food security around the world.

The Ag Advocate program is composed of a group of Penn State undergraduates in the College of Agricultural Sciences. Advocates are selected based on high academic achievement, involvement in extracurricular activities, interviews and faculty recommendations. There are eight new and 18 returning Ag Advocates for the 2017-2018 academic year.
October 6, 2017

An elite group of undergraduate students -- known as Ag Advocates -- serve as ambassadors for Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, building positive relationships with students, alumni and industry professionals.

October 5, 2017

Agribusiness management major Kayli Kumanchik found the internship she wanted with Land O' Lakes, Inc., after meeting with representatives at Ag Sciences Career Day in 2016. This year's event will take place on Oct. 10 in the Bryce Jordan Center on the University Park campus of Penn State.

Students from Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences will travel to Des Moines, Iowa, later this month to attend the 2017 Borlaug Dialogue, one of the events planned during the annual World Food Prize International Symposium. Seated, from left, are Ilse Huerta and Celize Christy. Standing are Maddy Nyblade and Emily Seiger. Missing from photo is Haley Stauffer.
October 5, 2017

Five students enrolled in College of Agricultural Sciences programs will represent Penn State at the 2017 Borlaug Dialogue, one of the events planned during the annual World Food Prize International Symposium.

October 4, 2017

What is liquefied natural gas, or LNG, and how is it made? What are its benefits compared to other energy sources? How is it transported, stored and consumed? And what are the markets for LNG? Those questions and more will be answered during a web-based seminar offered by Penn State Extension.

Planning and leading educational outreach is a cornerstone of a graduate program in pollinator ecology offered through Penn State's Center for Pollinator Research.
October 4, 2017

A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will enhance an innovative Penn State graduate training program in entomology and ecology aimed at helping to solve the multifaceted problem of pollinator decline.

Visitors at the Arboretum's 2016 Pumpkin Festival view lighted jack-o'-lanterns.
October 3, 2017

Creative pumpkin carvers will craft scores of imaginative jack-o'-lanterns and compete for ribbons as The Arboretum at Penn State hosts its annual Pumpkin Festival, Oct. 8 and Oct. 13-14. Festivities will take place in the Arboretum's H.O. Smith Botanic Gardens, at the corner of Bigler Road and Park Avenue on the University Park campus. Admission is free.

Projected temperature changes, with hotter nights and fewer cold days, may reduce maintenance costs for producers of beef cattle such as these Black Angus in the Northeast. More forage availability may increase grazing days in the region and boost the relevance of the beef cattle industry.
October 3, 2017

Climate change will not significantly impair animal agriculture in the Northeast region of the United States, according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers, who point out there are many variables in the future scenario they envision.

The Nepalese village of Thulo Pakhar was devastated by an earthquake in 2015. In the summer of 2017, CED major Kelli Herr examined how volunteers who travel to Nepal for relief efforts can impact the local economy.
October 3, 2017

Kelli Herr, senior in community, environment and development in the College of Agricultural Sciences at Penn State, spent her break a long way from home in Thulo Pakhar, Nepal. She worked with a group called All Hands Volunteers, a U.S.-based nonprofit disaster relief organization.

October 3, 2017

The Graduate School at Penn State is pleased to host 15 new National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) award recipients for the 2017-18 academic year.

Lesson topics include getting started with pastures, plants in the pasture, pasture management, pasture facilities, grazing management and grazing economics. Each lesson has information about the topic and a worksheet for producers to complete and mail or email back to Penn State Extension for comments. 
October 3, 2017

Pennsylvania livestock producers looking for information on how to make their livestock enterprises more profitable through pasture and grazing management can take advantage of a home study course offered by Penn State Extension this fall.

Cathy Bowen, professor of agricultural and extension education and consumer issues.
October 2, 2017

Cathy Bowen, professor of agricultural and extension education and consumer issues, has spent nearly 30 years at Penn State helping Pennsylvanians and students to become financially literate, and manage their resources.

Amish farm
September 29, 2017

Beyond the picturesque barns and horse-drawn buggies that define Pennsylvania Dutch Country lurk farm dangers that can land children in the hospital.

A mobile app that can help diagnose crop diseases is being field tested in Tanzania.
September 29, 2017

Researchers who developed a new mobile application that uses artificial intelligence to accurately diagnose crop diseases in the field have won a $100,000 award to help expand their project to help millions of small-scale farmers across Africa. David Hughes, associate professor of entomology and biology, Penn State, leads the project with James Legg, of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture.

Faculty, staff, postdocs and students discuss microbiome research during a networking event in October 2016. A similar event is planned for Oct. 3 this year.
September 29, 2017

Those interested in learning about or participating in microbiome research at Penn State are invited to attend a networking event Oct. 3 sponsored by the University's Microbiome Research Center.

A honey bee pollinates an apple blossom. Pennsylvania's apple industry relies on insect pollination to produce an annual crop worth about $124 million.
September 28, 2017

Farmers, gardeners and other Pennsylvanians concerned about the health of pollinators — given their critically important role in growing and producing food — now have the chance to comment on a draft of the state’s proposed Pollinator Protection Plan. The plan, developed by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and the Center for Pollinator Research at Penn State, is designed to protect bees and other insects that pollinate nearly 75 percent of the Commonwealth’s food crops.