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Stauffer forges ties during China trip

Posted: July 25, 2011

Jay Stauffer, Distinguished Professor of Ichthyology in the School of Forest Resources, recently returned from a month-long trip to China, where he strengthened connections with Chinese university students and researchers.
Jay Stauffer (left), Distinguished Professor of Ichthyology, and Norman Barr, a Penn State master's and Ph.D. graduate, pause during their trip to China this summer.

Jay Stauffer (left), Distinguished Professor of Ichthyology, and Norman Barr, a Penn State master's and Ph.D. graduate, pause during their trip to China this summer.

Hosted by Dr. Zhihong Li, associate dean of the College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University (CAU), Stauffer taught a graduate course in invasive-species biology and gave seminars at the Fisheries Institute, the Quarantine Institute, the Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine's Institute of Animal and Plant Quarantine, and the Beijing Fisheries Research Institute.

He also edited many papers produced by students of Dr. Li's laboratory and offered suggestions for the undergraduate and graduate programs of CAU.

The graduate course was based on Stauffer's work in North America, Central America and Africa. Most of the students were studying identification and control of invasive fruit flies, so Stauffer drew heavily on the work of Norman Barr, a master's and Ph.D graduate from Penn State, and Bruce McPheron, professor of entomology and dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences, relative to bar coding of fruit flies (Tephritidae).

Stauffer has been invited back to continue teaching graduate courses and has made several contacts that could lead to joint projects studying aquaculture, native fish species and control of schistosomiasis (bilharzia) throughout China.

-cdg