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Guidelines & Judging Criteria

2018 Instructions To Exhibitors

Displays must be mounted on their designated boards in the Life Sciences Bridge by 4 p.m. on Tuesday, March 27. Presenters must be present at their posters between 4:00 and 6:00 pm on this day for review by the judges as well as to interact with those who attend the Expo. Pizza and soda will be provided to exhibitors around 5:00 pm.

Exhibitors are also expected to be present for the GSD Celebration of Excellence Ceremony at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 29 in 112 Forest Resources Building. Advisers are strongly encouraged to attend the Ceremony with their advisees. Monetary awards will be given to undergraduate and graduate winners. All poster materials must be removed no later than 9:00 pm on Tuesday March 27, 2018.

Exhibit Guidelines/Judging Criteria

Exhibits will be judged on their quality in three areas:

Abstract (10% of total score)

The purpose of the abstract is to summarize the significant findings of the research being presented.  The abstract is part of the registration process, and, once submitted it will not be available for any subsequent modifications, so be sure that your abstract is complete, concise, and reflective of the overall content of the submission. Abstracts are limited to maximum of 300 words (12 pt font) and should be submitted as a Word document.

Content (40% of total score)

The purpose of an exhibit is to convey to a wide audience a research project’s significance to scholars in the field and its potential significance to the general public.

The exhibit should testify to the careful design and execution of the research and present clear results that are well interpreted. It must include:

  • short title of the exhibit
  • student's name (or names, if more than one student is presenting the exhibit)
  • collaborators, advisor(s), and department(s)
  • funding sources
  • proof of regulatory committee approval (if the project involves human or animal subjects or bio-hazardous materials)
  • objectives
  • significance to the field
  • significance to society in general
  • methods
  • results
  • interpretation of results and conclusions
  • directions for future research

Display (30% of total score)

The core of each exhibit is a poster, with text and graphics intended for a more general audience with no prior knowledge in your specific discipline.

  • The poster must be mounted on the poster stand provided using Velcro only and may not exceed its dimensions, which are 46 inches wide by 46 inches high. Posters should be smaller than this to fit into the poster display area. 
  • Typically, large format posters are printed at the maximum of 41 inches width on 42 inches wide paper.
  • The poster should attract attention and convey information.
  • Language should be simple and descriptions brief. Jargon should be avoided; necessary technical terms should be defined.
  • Spelling and grammar must be correct. All text should be large enough to be read from a distance of 4 to 6 feet. 
  • Photographs, drawings, charts, tables, or graphs should be simple, well organized, and carefully chosen to quickly explain complicated technical concepts to a wide audience.

Oral presentation (20% of total score)

Each student should have prepared an oral discussion of his or her exhibit. This discussion must not exceed 5 minutes. A videotape or demonstration cannot be submitted for the discussion. The oral presentation should be clear and concise and should include the major points presented on the poster:

  • objectives
  • significance to the field
  • significance to society in general
  • methods
  • results
  • interpretation of results and conclusions
  • directions for future research

If the student worked with collaborators on the project, including his or her advisor, this presentation must clearly describe the student’s role in the overall project.