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University Faculty Senate Policy 44-20

Posted: December 10, 2013

Policy 44-20 stipulates that any end-of-semester examinations may only be administered during the final exam period.

University Faculty Senate Policy 44-20 stipulates that any end-of-semester examinations (with the exception of quizzes and narrowly limited tests worth no more than ten percent of the semester grade) may only be administered during the final exam period.  When end-of-semester examinations are not administered, term projects, reports and other integrative assignments worth more than ten percent of the course grade may not be due earlier than the first day of the final examination period.

 

Please note that the University Faculty Senate policy does include a provision for exceptions to the ten percent criterion—"for educational reasons and only as recommended by the faculty of the program offering the course and approved by the appropriate dean or chancellor."  In addition, Academic Administrative Policy/Procedure F-2 provides a procedure for students to follow if she or he believes the Senate policy has been violated.

 

Senate policy also governs the circumstances in which students may request an alternate exam time—those being either a direct conflict (two exams scheduled at the same time) or an overload conflict (too many exams within a prescribed time period). The official final exam week generally precludes the scheduling of other sanctioned activities that would normally represent excused class absences. Students therefore should not need to request make-up exams because of "other sanctioned activities." There might, however, still be circumstances involving serious illness or family emergency under which a provision for a make-up, or alternative timing, should be made. That does not include a prematurely scheduled flight home or the convenience of an early-week ride offer.

 

Per Senate policy, deferred grades (DF) and no grades (NG) prevent students from graduating; timely submission of grades will avoid unintentionally disadvantaging our students.