Share

Ag Springboard Spotlight: Woody Wilson

Posted: April 16, 2012

Woody Wilson was one of many participants in the 2011 College of Agricultural Sciences Springboard Competition who viewed the competition beyond a simple submission. Wilson, a senior, who will graduate in May 2012 with a degree in agriculture, created an entire professional business plan for the competition that quickly turned into a full-fledged business that he plans to manage after graduation.

Woody Wilson was one of many participants in the 2011 College of Agricultural Sciences Springboard Competition who viewed the competition beyond a simple submission. Wilson, a senior, who will graduate in May 2012 with a degree in agriculture, created an entire professional business plan for the competition that quickly turned into a full-fledged business that he plans to manage after graduation.

“Wilson’s Homegrown Farms” provides garden implementation for homeowners and businesses by designing, installing and managing backyard vegetable gardens in the State College area. Wilson’s main goal is to provide a service for the local community where State College residents are able to eat food that is grown close to where they live and work. While many communities embrace the idea of homegrown gardens they lack the management to maintain them.

Wilson’s business will plan customized gardens, install gardens catered to your needs as well as manage it weekly. What all began as an Ag Springboard Competition submission has lead Wilson to his future career attaining the college’s goal of promoting entrepreneurship which he far exceeded.

Having first heard about the competition through the agricultural newsletter that is sent out weekly, Wilson decided that it sounded like a beneficial opportunity for anyone in the industry.

“The competition ended up turning into a huge challenge for me,” said Wilson. “I realized there is a lot that goes into making a business which caused me to fall more in love with my idea because it became a lot more of an educational project.”

Although Wilson did not place in the Springboard Competition, it did not stop him from continuing his project during the next couple of months.

“The greatest thing the competition offered me was motivation and having deadlines,” said Wilson. “It was great to have that kick start motivation and get feedback from the judges who were all businessmen and women who knew what they were talking about.”

Wilson originally attended St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia before transferring to Penn State University to study turf grass science. Wilson soon realized turf grass science was not his passion and switched his major to agricultural sciences where he has had the opportunity to take classes in etymology, horticulture and leadership development. Wilson currently manages a small mini farm in his backyard for himself and his neighborhood, which is what inspired him to focus on the local food growing experience. 

By Kayla Inserra

Account Associate for Happy Valley Communications