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Joy Pate, Ph.D.

Joy Pate, Ph.D., is the C. Lee Rumberger and Family Chair in Agricultural Sciences and the Director of the Center for Reproductive Biology and Health. Her research focuses on function of the corpus luteum, a hormone-secreting structure found in an ovary, with emphasis on the interactions between resident T lymphocytes and the steroidogenic cells within the CL.

Joy Pate, Ph.D., received her B.S. from the University of Delaware and Ph.D. from the University of New Hampshire. She was appointed as Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University in 1983, where she was promoted to Professor and served a term as Associate Chair of the Department of Animal Sciences. While at OSU, she received awards including the Outstanding Young Teacher Award in the College of Agriculture, the Gamma Sigma Delta Research Award and the OARDC Senior Faculty Research Award.

In 2008, Dr. Pate moved to Penn State University, where she is currently the C. Lee Rumberger and Family Chair in Agricultural Sciences and the Director of the Center for Reproductive Biology and Health. Also in 2008, she was a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Fellow and Visiting Scientist at Okayama and Obihiro Agricultural Universities, and presented the W. Berry Memorial Lecture at Texas A&M University. In 2010, she presented the Keynote Address at the Triangle Consortium for Reproductive Biology, focused on Reproductive Immunology, in North Carolina.

Dr. Pate has served on the Editorial Boards of Biology of Reproduction, Reproduction, Domestic Animal Endocrinology, Journal of Reproductive Immunology and American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and on NIH and USDA study sections, including a 2-year term as Panel Manager for a USDA panel.

Dr. Pate has been very active in The Society for the Study of Reproduction, serving as Program Chair, Director, Secretary and President. She chaired the Organizing Committee of the Inaugural World Congress on Reproductive Biology held in Hawaii in 2008 and was a member of the Organizing Committees of the International Congress of Reproductive Immunology (2010) and the international Ruminant Reproduction Symposium (2010).

Dr. Pate’s research focuses on function of the corpus luteum with emphasis on the interactions between resident T lymphocytes and the steroidogenic cells within the CL. She was the first to report the expression of class II MHC molecules in the CL and the ability of luteal steroidogenic cells to activate autologous T cells. Her research has been funded through USDA and NIH grants continuously since 1985. Dr. Pate has been involved in undergraduate and graduate teaching throughout her career, including development of a study abroad program to Australia.