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October 12, 2016

Speaking to a crowd of several hundred last week, Randall Stephenson's, frankness underscored a sense of personal alarm over the spread of racially charged violence in the United States. Spurred on by events, he spoke urgently about the need for difficult conversations about race - and in so doing became one of the most outspoken corporate leaders on the Black Lives Matter movement. Randall Stephenson is CEO of AT&T.

August 29, 2016

I n the fall of 2008, a team of researchers began studying some 3,000 Pell Grant recipients who had enrolled in Wisconsin’s 42 public colleges and universities for the first time that year. At age 18, they were ambitious, committed (all began full time), and entirely unaware that, six years later, fewer than half of them would complete a degree of any kind.

August 25, 2016

The grass is greener ... if you're a student in Detroit, looking across your school district's boundary with the neighboring Grosse Pointe public schools. Nearly half of Detroit's students live in poverty; that means a family of four lives on roughly $24,000 a year — or less. In Grosse Pointe, a narrow stretch of real estate nestled between Detroit and Lake St. Clair, just 7 percent of students live at or below the poverty line. To recap, that's 49 percent vs. 7 percent. Neighbors. Which is why a new report from the nonprofit EdBuild ranks the Detroit-Grosse Pointe boundary as "the most segregating school district border in the country."

August 25, 2016

The debate over which restroom transgender students may use at school is now playing out in the nation's courtrooms, presenting a lot of uncertainty for school leaders just as millions of students return to classrooms for the new academic year.

August 4, 2016

The universal truth of puberty and adolescence is body change, and relatively rapid body change. Teenagers have to cope with all kinds of comparisons, with their peers, with the childhood bodies they leave behind, and with the altered images used in advertising and in the self-advertising on social media.

July 11, 2016

State and local spending on prisons and jails is increasing at a faster rate than spending on public education over the past three decades, according to a U.S. Department of Education report. The report, released Thursday, highlights a dramatic increase in spending on prisons and jails nationally, and the relative disparity in increases to education-related spending.

July 11, 2016

When it comes to broadening college access and enhancing student success throughout the United States, philanthropic foundations have increasingly taken a leading role in helping to shape the national dialogue.

June 24, 2016

To many observers, the Supreme Court’s 4-to-3 decision on Thursday that upheld the use of race-conscious admissions at the University of Texas at Austin came as a surprise.

June 16, 2016

The image of black and white children hand-in-hand is possibly the most well-known and most often quoted line from Martin Luther King Jr.'s “I Have a Dream” speech. Over the years, black and white youngsters playing together has evolved from a civil-rights leader’s vision of racial equality to a clothing retailer’s marketing campaign, and in the process spawned a cultural meme—signaling everything from innocence and hope to a world free of interpersonal racism. Yet black and white childhood friendships, an inspiring notion, rarely happen organically.

June 16, 2016

By 2020, more than 5 million post-9/11 service members will transition from the military into civilian life. Many will enter the workforce, while others will use the GI Bill to earn their bachelor’s or graduate degrees. Your college or university needs to begin recruiting more veterans now. These students bring necessary diversity to the classroom by possessing experience most civilians can’t understand. Plus, while fewer students are earning a postsecondary education, institutions can compensate by enrolling service members who already come with governmental subsidies.

May 24, 2016

Baltimore, Md. — In the 1970s, Norman Francis’ epic tenure as president of the nation’s only Black Catholic University was just beginning, and at the same time, he learned that the number of Black students in the nation’s medical schools was dwindling. Unequal education, he concluded, was robbing Black students of their chance to even get into college, let alone medical school. Francis decided to take on the country’s problem and seize an opportunity for his small campus to help fill the gap.

May 2, 2016

When collaborative scientific projects expand across geographic boundaries, they introduce a new set of challenges, as culturally diverse individuals must share responsibilities. To navigate the increasingly global scientific landscape, researchers must maintain a level of “cultural competence,” or a balance of knowledge, attitudes, and skills required to manage interactions and relationships with individuals from different ethnic, racial, religious, geographic, and social groups.

April 28, 2016

In the '80s and '90s, America's suicide trend was headed in the right direction: down. "It had been decreasing almost steadily since 1986, and then what happened is there was a turnaround," says Sally Curtin, a statistician with the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The suicide rate has risen by a quarter, to 13 per 100,000 people in 2014 from 10.5 in 1999, according to an analysis by Curtin and her colleagues that was released Friday.

April 21, 2016

The prevalence of the manologue is deeply rooted in the fact that men take, and are allocated, more time to talk in almost every professional setting. Women self-censor, edit, apologize for speaking. Men expound. Society rewards men for talking too much, but penalizes women.

April 20, 2016

The U.S. Treasury will put African American abolitionist Harriet Tubman on the front of the new $20 bill, replacing former president Andrew Jackson, who will be moved to the back of the bill, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced Wednesday. Former Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton will remain on the front of the new $10 bill, after the Treasury encountered fierce opposition to its initial plan to demote the founding father to make way for a woman to appear on the paper currency, the department said.

April 4, 2016

Many in the education world talk about the power of expectations, expressing the belief that if adults in a school expect students to succeed, then students will rise to that expectation, and if adults expect failure — well, that, too, can be a self-fulfilling prophecy.

March 30, 2016

Of all myths associated with American Indians no myth is as pervasive as the myth of the vanishing Indian. We are all familiar with many of the other myths that were invented over the last 500 years and thanks to the work of Native activists, writers, intellectuals, and their allies we have begun to dismantle some of them in meaningful ways. Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/print/2015/08/30/real-indians-vanishing-native-myth-and-blood-quantum-question

March 21, 2016

Nearly 200 children died and are buried at the former Carlisle Indian School. Now the Rosebud Sioux want to reclaim their ancestors. CARLISLE, Pa. — They want the bones of their children back. They want the remains of the boys and girls who were taken from their American Indian families in the West, spirited a thousand miles to the East, and, when they died not long after arrival, were buried here in the fertile Pennsylvania soil.

March 17, 2016

SAN FRANCISCO ― The National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE) and the American Council on Education (ACE) held joint sessions at their co-located annual meetings on Tuesday with a heavy diversity emphasis. Front and center at a session titled, “Campus Climate: Multiple Perspectives from Campus Leaders,” was a man who is now in the eye of the storm — interim University of Missouri System President Michael Middleton.