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2017

Rural Areas Show Overall Population Decline and Shifting Regional Patterns of Population Change
September 12, 2017
The number of people living in rural (nonmetro) counties stood at 46.1 million in July 2016—14 percent of all U.S. residents spread across 72 percent of the Nation’s land area. The rural population declined by 21,000 between July 2015 and July 2016, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s latest population estimates, the sixth consecutive year of modest population losses. Although many rural counties have shown population losses for decades, this is the first period on record of overall rural population decline.
Insensitive or Racist?
September 5, 2017
Study finds that students who deliver microaggressions are also likely to harbor racist attitudes.
How Women Select Majors
August 22, 2017
Study finds adherence to gender norms around femininity is linked to gender disparities in selection of programs of study. Women and men are, in theory, free to choose their college majors without any interference. So why do majors -- and in turn, certain jobs and roles in society -- remain segregated? Many women in STEM fields, for example, have cited discrimination and discriminatory attitudes as hardships they face in academia and in the private sector, and a new paper adds another factor to the mix: feminine norms, and how women perceive and adhere to femininity.
The Missing Black Professors
August 22, 2017
Study of top public universities finds limited faculty diversity, yet signs of progress -- except for African-Americans in STEM. Efforts to diversify the faculty may not be focusing enough on key areas, namely math-based fields -- especially when it comes to black faculty members. And such efforts haven’t led to any premium in pay for those hired to contribute to campus diversity. That’s all according to a new study of faculty representation and wage gaps by race and gender in six major fields at 40 selective public universities.
U. of Florida Denies White Supremacist Richard Spencer’s Request for Event Space
August 17, 2017
The University of Florida has denied the National Policy Institute’s request to rent event space for Richard Spencer, the white supremacist who leads the organization, to speak on campus, the university’s president said in a statement on Wednesday. The university denied the request after the violent weekend on the University of Virginia’s campus highlighted potential safety risks for Florida’s campus, the statement said. On social media, the city of Gainseville, Fla., was dubbed “the next battlefield” for violent protests from hate groups.
Justice Department Will Target Affirmative Action
August 14, 2017
A bombshell report in The New York Times Tuesday night revealed that the U.S. Justice Department plans to investigate and sue colleges over their affirmative action policies in admissions. The Times cited an internal announcement to the Justice Department's civil rights division that seeks lawyers for a project on “investigations and possible litigation related to intentional race-based discrimination in college and university admissions.”
Talk About Diverse Hiring Often Means Faculty. What About Staff?
June 30, 2017
When colleges talk about diverse hiring, much of the focus — and the funding — goes to recruiting and retaining faculty members from underrepresented minority groups. But a program in the works at the University of California at Berkeley is looking at new ways to elevate an overlooked cohort: minority staff in nonacademic areas, like student-affairs administrators and office managers.
Research Shows Increase in School Segregation in the South
June 27, 2017
Report by Civil Rights Project at UCLA, Center for Education and Civil Rights at Penn State finds intense segregation of Black and Latino students. Charter Schools are more segregated for Black and Latino Students. Black and Latino students in the South are increasingly isolated in intensely segregated schools and are doubly segregated in schools serving low-income students, according to new research released today by the Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles at UCLA and the Center for Education and Civil Rights at Penn State.
Immigrant farmworkers and SNAP- SNAP less likely to be used by immigrant farmworkers eligible for benefit
June 26, 2017
The federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) — formerly known as “food stamps” — that helps low-income individuals and families purchase food is less likely to be used by farmworkers eligible for the benefit who are immigrants, Hispanic, male, childless or residing in California, new research from UC Davis health economists shows. Published in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, the study undercuts the common assumption that immigrant crop workers, especially Hispanic crop workers, utilize SNAP more than others. It also highlights the need to address nonparticipation among those who are legally eligible and could benefit from the program, which reduces hunger and stimulates spending.
LGBTQ College Presidents: Work Not Over for Those Who are ‘Out’
June 5, 2017
The shift in public attitude is part of the larger context in which LGBTQ Presidents in Higher Education continues its efforts to empower LGBTQ individuals in academe to navigate their way toward leadership positions and, ultimately, to presidencies at institutions of higher education.
O Canada - American Students at record numbers are accepting offers of admission from Canadian Universities
May 22, 2017
Immediately after last year's presidential election, Canadian universities started to report record traffic on their websites, coming from American high school students. Then the universities started to report more trips to campus from south of the border. And more applications. But the question remained: Would Americans enroll? As Canadian universities start to report on their admissions cycle, the answer is Yes. And not only will Canada be attracting more American undergraduate talent, but more from other countries as well.
Due North. Professor says she’s giving up a tenure-track job in the U.S. and taking her family back to Canada over racism directed at her Nicaraguan-born spouse.
May 9, 2017
A professor of music theory at Elon University is walking away from the job she loves and moving back to Canada with no immediate other employment prospects. Why? Racism in the U.S. is taking a toll on her family. At a certain point, said Robin Attas, a white Canadian who is married to a Nicaraguan man, “it was clear for me that I could choose between my job and my husband’s life. I chose my husband.”
Divinity, Diversity and Division
May 9, 2017
Professor calls diversity training workshop to which colleagues were invited a “waste,” setting off debate about inclusiveness and civility. Divinity schools aren’t void of infighting, but controversies from these centers of academic and spiritual contemplation rarely spill into the public domain. Unsurprisingly, then, recently released documents about an ongoing dispute over the role of diversity training within Duke University’s Divinity School have grabbed religious scholars’ attentions
Two Community College Presidents Shattering Stereotypes
May 5, 2017
In 1972, Rowena Tomaneng’s parents moved their family from the Philippines to the Los Angeles area in hopes of ­finding better educational opportunities for their children. Six years later, Thuy Thi Nguyen and her family were among “boat people” who left Vietnam, convinced that its Communist regime was far worse than the dangers at sea and the uncertainties ahead. Today, Thuy Thi Nguyen is president of Foothill College.
Racial Incidents at 3 Campuses
May 2, 2017
Three campuses are experiencing heightened racial tensions following recent incidents: 1. Sit-In at St. Olaf - Hundreds of students at St. Olaf College held a sit-in Saturday afternoon and through the night in the student center to protest recent racial incidents on the campus. 2. Bananas have again become a source of racial tension at American University. In the fall, black students protested over incidents in which they said one had a banana thrown at her and another found a rotten banana left outside her dormitory room. 3. Mexican Stereotypes at Baylor Party. Read more.
Penn State Chapter Hosted National MANRRS Conference
April 13, 2017
MANRRS 2017 – On March 29-April 2nd Penn State MANRRS Chapter traveled to Pittsburgh for the National MANRRS Conference. Nine of the students in our MANRRS Chapter attended with the hopes of gaining leadership skills, internship opportunities, and networking for success. This was the first time in over 10 years the conference was in Pennsylvania, and Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences by way of the Office of Multicultural Affairs were co-sponsors and co-hosts of the annual event. MANRRS Conferences are also a time for the students to compete with peers in judged competitions such as research discussions, poster presentations, and essay contests. This is where Penn State shines on an almost annual basis: Maurice Smith Jr, PhD Candidate in AEE at Penn State, took home first prize in Oral Research Contest - Division II - Graduate Student. Celize Christy, 1st year Masters Student in Rural Soc, won a 2nd place award in her research discussion contest. Chenira Smith and Merielle Stamm, both first year master’s students in AEE, won second and third place prizes, respectively, in the Research poster Contest II - Graduate Student division. It was amazing to see the hard work of these students pay off on a national level. Celize Christy was also awarded the Cynthia Hayes Memorial Scholarship from the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition and the South Eastern African American Farmers’ Organic Network (SAAFON). She won this scholarship through an essay contest. Congratulations Celize! Courtnee Eddington, 3rd year PhD student in Entomology, also highlights Penn State’s leadership role in MANRRS by being chosen as the Region 1 Graduate Vice President. Courtnee will do great in this role as a graduate liaison from the MANRRS chapters in our region to the national office. Overall, the conference was great. With over 950 registrants, representation from most of the 1862 and 1890 institutions, MANRRS is growing. We hope to continue to promote diversity in Ag Sciences here at Penn State through MANRRS and look forward to next year in Greensboro, NC.
Diverse Conversations: What Minority High School Students Need to Know About College
April 5, 2017
It's a well-known fact that a college education is becoming necessary for many jobs. Companies are listing bachelor’s degrees as requirements on vacancy announcements, automatically screening out anyone who doesn’t have the required education. In addition, as technology replaces the work of employees in certain traditionally unskilled labor positions, the number of opportunities for those with just a high school diploma only seems to shrink. However, going to college isn’t an automatic choice for many. In fact, what they are taught in high school about the college experience has a major impact on a student’s decision. So, what should we be teaching minority high school students about college? Here are some places to start.
New Budget Proposal May Hit Hispanic-Serving Institutions Hardest
March 20, 2017
After meeting with President Trump and members of Congress in late February, presidents and chancellors of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) expressed a sense of cautious optimism that there might be more support for their institutions under the new administration. Those hopes were not realized when the administration rolled out its budget proposal on Thursday. Instead of channeling more dollars to HBCUs, the new administration seeks to maintain current funding levels. Pell Grant funding, a program critical to the continuing viability of many HBCUs, would stay the same, while other programs, like TRIO and GEAR UP, that are designed to help low-income and first-generation college students through college, would see a loss of funding or be eliminated altogether in the Trumpian vision of America.
Scholars: Student Hunger, Homelessness Underrecognized
March 16, 2017
Of all the students who visited the food pantry at Montgomery College in recent times, one that stood out for pantry worker and honors student Elizabeth Zabala is the young man who came to get something to eat for a specific assignment. He had been taking a course called Nutrition 101, Zabala said, and needed to eat in order to do a diet analysis for the class. “He didn’t have enough money to buy food to do that assignment,” Zabala recalled. “I really admired him for the dedication to his schoolwork because he was still going to class. You could tell how weak he was because he wasn’t eating enough.”
Diversity Officers Under Trump: Rattled but Voicing Resolve
March 15, 2017
T he task of making college students feel welcome on campus has been greatly complicated by both the election of President Trump and the political currents that helped put him in office, said campus diversity officers who gathered here on Tuesday. As the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education convened its annual conference, participants and guest speakers described themselves as shell-shocked by his victory and alarmed by the impact that the nation’s growing political polarization has had on their institutions.
Renowned Black Law Professor Files Complaint Against Campbell University for Discrimination
March 2, 2017
Black law professor who gained national exposure for having predicted Donald J. Trump’s election victory in an eight-month series of 2016 television appearances and Harvard Law Record articles, has filed federal civil rights charges against Campbell University. Amos Jones In documents obtained by Diverse, associate professor of law Amos Jones alleges a pattern of discrimination and retaliation in hiring and promotion amid a Whites-dominated tenure pattern at the 40-year-old, Raleigh, North Carolina, school historically related to the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina.
Doubts on Diversifying the Facultly
January 31, 2017
Many colleges and universities have for years been stating that they are trying to attract more minority faculty members. And for just as long, critics have been saying that colleges aren't doing all they can. This issue has taken on new urgency in the last two years as minority student protests on many campuses have demanded a more diversified faculty -- and many colleges have made specific pledges to hire more minority professors.
Justice Sotomayor Says Universities Need More Diversity
January 31, 2017
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor on Monday said future diversity on college campuses is a key to diversifying society at large, noting that the number of Black students at the University of Michigan is a “real problem.”
Addressing Racist Microaggressions
January 10, 2017
Many colleges and universities pride themselves on their commitment to diversity, yet that commitment often seems to be superficial, writes Macy Wilson.
Can We Really Measure Implicit Bias? Maybe Not
January 6, 2017
I harbor a moderate preference for white faces. You probably do, too: About 70 percent of people who take the race version of the Implicit Association Test show the same tendency — that is, they prefer faces with typically European-American features over those with African-American features. Since it first went online in 1998, millions have visited Harvard’s Project Implicit website, and the results have been cited in thousands of peer-reviewed papers. No other measure has been as influential in the conversation about unconscious bias.
On the Front Lines of a New Culture War
January 4, 2017
St. Cloud State University spent 15 years trying to become a beacon of diversity and tolerance while its city fought over the arrival of Muslim refugees. Then Donald Trump came along.